RichardTerra

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Ted Williams suspension raises profile of Alcor, cyronics

By | 2017-06-01T14:28:56+00:00 July 10th, 2002|Nanodot, News|

The New York Times has an extensive article ("Even for the Last .400 Hitter, Cryonics Is the Longest Shot", by M. Janofsky, 9 July 2002) on the controversy sparked by the cryonic suspension of baseball great Ted Williams at the Alcor Life Extension Foundation facility in Arizona:

Sent here by his son, Williams, the Boston Red Sox slugger who died last week at 83, has become the 50th -- and by far the most famous -- "patient" at the Alcor Life Extension Foundation, which preserves bodies in the hope that breakthroughs in medical science will someday make it possible to resuscitate them.

The article notes: "All of this has elevated the profile of Alcor and its president and chief executive, Dr. Jerry B. Lemler. Since the weekend, when reporters indicated that Williams's body was being sent here, the phones have rung incessantly and the Alcor Web site, www.alcor.org, has been clogged with visitors, said Dr. Lemler, a lifelong Yankees fan from New Rochelle, N.Y."

"This has raised public awareness about cryonics and about Alcor," Dr. Lemler said. "We're under scrutiny like never before, and we welcome it. We were anxious for so many years to be able to state our philosophies, our goals, our convictions, as well as our prices and our disclaimers."

Ted Williams suspension raises profile of Alcor, cyronics

By | 2017-06-01T14:28:56+00:00 July 10th, 2002|Nanodot|

The New York Times has an extensive article ("Even for the Last .400 Hitter, Cryonics Is the Longest Shot", by M. Janofsky, 9 July 2002) on the controversy sparked by the cryonic suspension of baseball great Ted Williams at the Alcor Life Extension Foundation facility in Arizona:

Sent here by his son, Williams, the Boston Red Sox slugger who died last week at 83, has become the 50th -- and by far the most famous -- "patient" at the Alcor Life Extension Foundation, which preserves bodies in the hope that breakthroughs in medical science will someday make it possible to resuscitate them.

The article notes: "All of this has elevated the profile of Alcor and its president and chief executive, Dr. Jerry B. Lemler. Since the weekend, when reporters indicated that Williams's body was being sent here, the phones have rung incessantly and the Alcor Web site, www.alcor.org, has been clogged with visitors, said Dr. Lemler, a lifelong Yankees fan from New Rochelle, N.Y."

"This has raised public awareness about cryonics and about Alcor," Dr. Lemler said. "We're under scrutiny like never before, and we welcome it. We were anxious for so many years to be able to state our philosophies, our goals, our convictions, as well as our prices and our disclaimers."

Singapore backs nanotechnology business

By | 2017-06-01T14:28:56+00:00 July 9th, 2002|Nanodot|

Gina Miller writes "AsiaBizTech reports: Singapore Backs Nanotechnology Business . Singapore's government is looking to move forward with nanotechnology promotion that would impliment disk storage and biological fields by cooperating with overseas bodies such as Japan. Although their budget is smaller than the U.S. and Japan, today it stands at S$65 million, larger than all previous nanotech budgets. In January of 2002, the National University of Singapore Nanoscience & Nanotechnology Initiative (NUSNNI) was established. Since that time Singapore has set up the Institute of Bioengineering, began began joint research with a U.S. venture, SurroMed Inc., in nanobiology and expected to announce further venture projects."

Singapore backs nanotechnology business

By | 2017-06-01T14:28:56+00:00 July 9th, 2002|Media Mentions, Nanodot|

Gina Miller writes "AsiaBizTech reports: Singapore Backs Nanotechnology Business . Singapore's government is looking to move forward with nanotechnology promotion that would impliment disk storage and biological fields by cooperating with overseas bodies such as Japan. Although their budget is smaller than the U.S. and Japan, today it stands at S$65 million, larger than all previous nanotech budgets. In January of 2002, the National University of Singapore Nanoscience & Nanotechnology Initiative (NUSNNI) was established. Since that time Singapore has set up the Institute of Bioengineering, began began joint research with a U.S. venture, SurroMed Inc., in nanobiology and expected to announce further venture projects."

UF team thinking small for treatments

By | 2017-06-01T14:28:56+00:00 July 9th, 2002|Future Medicine, Nanodot|

Gina Miller writes "The Gainesville Sun.com has an article: UF team thinking small for treatments . The Sun medical staff writer, reports that the University of Florida are developing "nanopharmaceuticals" and believe these drug-binding molecules to have great potential for drug transport to even the tiniest capillaries in the human body. The work is currently focused on drug overdose situations, in which these molecules could easily bind to the invader drug to reduce toxic effects. Dr. Donn Dennis, professor of anesthesiology and medical director of the research project states "Let's say you have a specific type of cancer cell in the bloodstream and want to get a chemotherapeutic agent to attack it. This technology has the potential to deliver that drug only to the inside of the cells that are cancerous. You would avoid all the side effects of the cancer drugs, which can make every organ in the body sick." Dennis says about nanotechnology "It has major implications not only in medicine, but in food production, energy production, and other fundamental problems that we face as the world's population continues to increase.""

UF team thinking small for treatments

By | 2017-06-01T14:28:56+00:00 July 9th, 2002|Nanodot|

Gina Miller writes "The Gainesville Sun.com has an article: UF team thinking small for treatments . The Sun medical staff writer, reports that the University of Florida are developing "nanopharmaceuticals" and believe these drug-binding molecules to have great potential for drug transport to even the tiniest capillaries in the human body. The work is currently focused on drug overdose situations, in which these molecules could easily bind to the invader drug to reduce toxic effects. Dr. Donn Dennis, professor of anesthesiology and medical director of the research project states "Let's say you have a specific type of cancer cell in the bloodstream and want to get a chemotherapeutic agent to attack it. This technology has the potential to deliver that drug only to the inside of the cells that are cancerous. You would avoid all the side effects of the cancer drugs, which can make every organ in the body sick." Dennis says about nanotechnology "It has major implications not only in medicine, but in food production, energy production, and other fundamental problems that we face as the world's population continues to increase.""

Space Elevator Conference

By | 2017-06-01T14:28:56+00:00 July 9th, 2002|Nanodot, News, Space|

JohnFaith writes "High Lift Systems will be sponsoring a conference in Seattle on implementing a carbon tether space elevator: http://www.confcon.com/sp_elev_02/sp_elev_02.html. There's also a story in the Seattle Times: http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/13 4489679_spaceelevator08m.html. This type of application has been mentioned in various nanotech books, so it will be interesting to see if the conference will mention molecular machines as a way to build these structures."

Space Elevator Conference

By | 2017-06-01T14:28:57+00:00 July 9th, 2002|Nanodot|

JohnFaith writes "High Lift Systems will be sponsoring a conference in Seattle on implementing a carbon tether space elevator: http://www.confcon.com/sp_elev_02/sp_elev_02.html. There's also a story in the Seattle Times: http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/13 4489679_spaceelevator08m.html. This type of application has been mentioned in various nanotech books, so it will be interesting to see if the conference will mention molecular machines as a way to build these structures."

NSF report highlights potential of emerging technologies

By | 2017-06-01T14:28:57+00:00 July 9th, 2002|Nanodot|

2012Rocky writes "From United Press International: Merged science promises golden age (UPI, July 08, 2002).

If several of today's leading scientific disciplines can overcome barriers to working cooperatively, within a couple of decades their efforts could produce concepts currently confined to science fiction, such as direct brain-to-brain communication, a National Science Foundation report released Monday predicts.

This article points out that the convergence of nano-, bio-, information technology and cognitive science could usher in a golden age for humanity. The 387 page pre-pub report goes in to much greater detail.
See the full report [a pre-publication on-line version]: Converging Technologies for Improving Human Performance"

NSF report highlights potential of emerging technologies

By | 2017-06-01T14:28:57+00:00 July 9th, 2002|Nanodot, New Institutions, News|

2012Rocky writes "From United Press International: Merged science promises golden age (UPI, July 08, 2002).

If several of today's leading scientific disciplines can overcome barriers to working cooperatively, within a couple of decades their efforts could produce concepts currently confined to science fiction, such as direct brain-to-brain communication, a National Science Foundation report released Monday predicts.

This article points out that the convergence of nano-, bio-, information technology and cognitive science could usher in a golden age for humanity. The 387 page pre-pub report goes in to much greater detail.
See the full report [a pre-publication on-line version]: Converging Technologies for Improving Human Performance"