Foresight Fellowship

The Foresight Fellowship is a one-year program committed to giving change-makers the support to accelerate their bold ideas into the future.

Our mission is to catalyze collaboration among leading young scientists, engineers, and innovators who work to advance technologies for flourishing futures. 

We believe that providing a strong network, knowledge exchange, and platform for fellows early can significantly advance their capability to make important strides in a variety of fields. 

During the 1 year program, Foresight Fellows are selected to be part of a tight core to advance beneficial use and avoid misuse of biotech, nanotech, neurotech, computer science, and space technologies. There is no minimum work requirement; this is a supportive program and we will work hand in hand with our fellows to advance your work. 

This can entail: 

 

  • Professional exposure, e.g. via podcasts and sharing updates with our sci-tech network (15k mailing list subscribers, 13k Youtube subscribers)
  • Travel-paid invitations to in-person workshops, conferences, and retreats
  • 1-1 mentor introductions to relevant funders, senior scientists, and previous fellowships cohorts
You may have other ideas! We will determine how to help you best together in our onboarding call.

 

2023 Fellowship
Foresight Mentors
Senior Fellows
2022 Fellows
2021 Fellows
2020 Fellows
2019 Fellows
2018 Fellows
2017 Fellows

Foresight Mentors

Sonia Arrison

Sonia Arrison is a best-selling author, analyst, entrepreneur, and investor. She is founder of 100 Plus Capital, co-founder of Unsugarcoat Media (acquired by Medium), and associate founder and advisor to Singularity University in Mountain View, California. Her research focuses on exponentially growing technologies and their impact on society. Her most recent book, 100 Plus: How the Coming Age of Longevity Will Change Everything, From Careers and Relationships to Family and Faith, addresses the social, economic, and cultural impacts of radical human longevity. It gained national best-seller status and keeps Sonia busy speaking all over the world. Sonia is a Board Member at the Thiel Foundation, Foresight Institute, and Woodland School. She is also a Senior Fellow at the Fraser Institute in Vancouver, British Columbia, and author of two previous books (Western Visions and Digital Dialog). She was previously a Director and Senior Fellow in Tech Studies at the Pacific Research Institute and a columnist at TechNewsWorld.

 

Amir Banifatemi

General Manager XPRIZE

My general focus is on identifying and developing emerging and transformative initiatives that can impact society in significant and exponential ways. I do this by helping create interdisciplinary frameworks for understanding and planning new developments and the funding required to bring new innovations to market.

I have managed a few private and public technology investment and venture capital funds and know how to establish fund operations and their overall strategies and requirements.
I also help innovative ventures and startups that target products that could generate sustainable economic and societal impact. I help teams on product roadmap strategy, pricing and business model, fundraising, and high-growth partnerships and mergers. Particular emphasis on AI and predictive systems, Quantum technology, Genomics, and crowd economics.

Dr. Dina Radenkovic

SALT

I am a medical doctor, bioinformatics researcher and healthcare entrepreneur. My current roles as a Partner at the SALT Bio Fund & Chief Scientific Officer of HOOKE allow me to utilise my passion to help build companies that bring new piece of science or technology to the people with the aim of improving their health & longevity. My research at Hooke and at the Buck Institute is focused on standardising all novel surrogate biomarkers of aging and intervention that can help people live longer, happier and healthier lives by compressing th number of years spent in bad health (morbidity) and increasing helathy life expectancy. I workd at Guy’s and St Thomas’NHS Foundation Trust, qualified from UCL Medical School, London, UK and had research posts at Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard, USA and King’s College London. My work is in the field of computational medicine focused on preventive cardiology and aging, but I also enjoy extending my research principles to a wider application of artificial intelligence in healthcare.

Stuart Armstrong

Aligned AI

My research at the Future of Humanity Institute centres on the safety and possibilities of Artificial Intelligence (AI), how to define the potential goals of AI and map humanity’s partially defined values into it, and the long term potential for intelligent life across the reachable universe. I’ve been working with people at the FHI and other organisations, such as DeepMind, to formalise AI desiderata in general models, so that AI designers can include these safety methods in their designs.

My past research interests include comparing existential risks in general, including their probability and their interactions, anthropic probability (how the fact that we exist affects our probability estimates around that key fact), decision theories that are stable under self-reflection and anthropic considerations, negotiation theory and how to deal with uncertainty about your own preferences, computational biochemistry, fast ligand screening, parabolic geometry, and my Oxford D. Phil. was on the holonomy of projective and conformal Cartan geometries.

Dr. Alexandra Bause

VentureLabs

Alexandra is leading the venture creation programs that aim at founding new biotech startups targeting the aging process at a molecular level. She is also managing the pipeline and diligence process for external investment opportunities, predominantly focusing on preclinical stage biotech companies. Before joining Apollo Ventures, Alexandra worked with The Boston Consulting Group where she specialized in biopharma strategy, market assessment and asset diligence. Her PhD studies at Harvard Medical School were focused on investigating the molecular mechanisms that contribute to cellular aging and could be targeted to increase mammalian health span. She is also a trained pharmacist with expertise in pharmaceutics and pharmacology.

Sourav Sinha

Longevity Vision Fund

Venture Partner, Head of Innovation
– Founder, CEO of Oncolinx
– Strategy at Celularity
– Forbes’ “30 Under 30: Healthcare”
– World Economic Forum Global Shaper
– Singularity University Global Solutions Program
– Dartmouth College

Tony Kulesa

Pillar VC

Previously, he was the founding Director of the MIT BioMakerspace, a community biology laboratory and incubator space, and an Instructor at the MIT Department of Biological Engineering. He holds a PhD from MIT, where his inventions of new platforms for drug discovery and microbial therapeutics were highlighted in Science Editor’s Choice and Nature Reviews Drug Discovery. While at MIT, he was a founding officer of MIT Biotech Group and co-founded and directed 3 courses on biotech and entrepreneurship, including BiomedStartup, a course that coaches 10+ teams per year on research commercialization projects.

Arye Lipman

MarsBio

Arye is a General Partner at MarsBio, a seed stage venture fund based in Los Angeles, investing in deeptech and biotech companies. He holds a degree in Molecular and Cellular Biology from UCLA, and has a background in biotech R&D and drug development, entrepreneurship, and angel investing. He serves as a board member and advisor for various life sciences startups and accelerator programs in Southern California, including Empath Ventures, Lab Launch, and Larta Institute.

Ben Sun

Ben Sun is an experienced investor active with angel-stage companies in Silicon Valley, Asia and other parts of the world. As a business executive, Ben is a market eco-system developer focused on technology and healthcare companies.

Ben has 20+ years of cross-border business experience in the fields of research, consulting, government, NGOs and investment. Earlier in his career, Ben was executive director of a China-based chapter of a global angel network.

Ben’s extensive range of business connections brings value to clients wishing to form market presence, distribution and technology support partnerships in Asia, Europe, Latin America and the US. Ben is expert in market entry planning, investment planning and funding solicitation. As an advisor, Ben works with startups from UC Berkeley’s SkyDeck accelerator. He also advises private industry executives and teams in the San Francisco Bay Area. He has helped listed companies come into the US market.

Ben has developed insights and access to innovators in up-and-coming global trends through his work with angel groups across Asia, US and Europe. He is a valued speaker at innovation conferences and judge at tech-pitch competitions.

Nils Regge, Apollo VC

Nils is a serial entrepreneur and company builder with a long-standing passion for health and biomedicine. At Apollo, Nils brings deal making skills, his impeccable business sense, and his expertise in growing early stage startups.

Nils founded company builder and investor TruVenturo in 2010, and he has taken part in over 30 financing rounds as an investor or co-founder among the companies he has cofounded. Of these, three have attained valuations over $100M, having attracted capital from top venture capital companies such as Insight Venture Partners, Highland Capital, and Harbourvest. Nils sits on the boards of multiple companies in his portfolio, helping to push them rapidly towards inflection points by focusing his teams towards only those activities that generate shareholder value. Nils has studied business in Hamburg and at UC Santa Barbara (UCSB) in California. He also completed the EO Entrepreneurial Master’s Program at MIT.

Dr. Jan Goetz, IQM Quantum Computers

Jan received his PhD on superconducting quantum circuits in 2017 from TU Munich and continued as a Postdoc in Helsinki at Aalto University. Helsinki is a great hub for quantum technology, which allowed him to receive a Marie-Curie Fellowship from the EU H2020 program. In addition, he has been working for the local Quantum Computer Project, where 8 research groups and the State Research Center VTT are co-developing a quantum processor. Based on these efforts and together with three co-founders, Jan has been spinning off a company, IQM Finland Oy. Since February 2019 he is the CEO of IQM and the company is now expanding their operations on the research campus in Espoo (Helsinki area). IQM’s is to developing a fast lane for quantum computer using innovative technology for 2nd generation quantum processors.

Andrew Scott, London Business School

Andrew J. Scott is Professor of Economics at London Business School having previously held positions at Oxford University, London School of Economics and Harvard University. His work focuses on the economics of longevity and he is the co-author of “The 100 Year Life” and “The New Long Life”. He was Managing Editor for the Royal Economic Society’s Economic Journal and Non-Executive Director for the UK’s Financial Services Authority 2009-2013. He is currently on the advisory board of the UK’s Office for Budget Responsibility, the Cabinet Office Honours Committee (Science and Technology), co-founder of The Longevity Forum, a member of the WEF council on Healthy Ageing and Longevity and a consulting scholar at Stanford University’s Center on Longevity. Andrew is also the recipient of an ESRC grant for researching the economic longevity dividend.

Jim O’Neill, SENS Research Foundation

Jim has advised, invested in, and nurtured more than seventy science and technology companies. While running the Thiel Foundation, he co-founded the Thiel Fellowship and helped create deep science fund Breakout Labs. Thiel Fellows have created more than $90 billion in equity value by founding companies including Freenome, Luminar, Figma, Upstart, OYO, Ethereum, Workflow, Fossa, and the Longevity Fund. Before moving to California, Jim helped lead the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services as the principal associate deputy secretary. His responsibilities included overseeing policy and regulations at NIH, FDA, and CDC and he led two major reforms of FDA. He also supported the creation of the Armed Forces Institute for Regenerative Medicine, served on the steering committee of the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, and represented the United States on the U.S. delegation to the World Health Assembly.​

Reason, Repair Biotechnologies

Reason is co-founder and CEO of Repair Biotechnologies. He is the founder and writer of Fight Aging!, a leading news website in the biotech community. Reason is also an active angel investor in the space. Previously, Reason was principal software engineer at technology startups. Reason has Masters degrees in Space Physics and Astrophysics.​

Joe Betts-LaCroix, CEO, Retro Biosciences

Following an academic background at Harvard, MIT, and Caltech, being an inventor on over 100 patents and applications, founding two prior companies with a combined 185 employees, spending 2 years as a part-time partner at Y Combinator, investing in and advising numerous biotechs, and publishing a Science paper in biophysics, Joe is now the CEO of Retro Biosciences, which uses high-throughput, high-dimensional approaches to develop therapies for diseases driven by the biology of aging.

Tina Wood, Collider Health

Tina is an ecosystem architect and works with organisations in both private and public sectors to accelerate innovation and transform health with sustainable impact at scale.

Morgan Levine, Yale University

Morgan Levine is a ladder-rank Assistant Professor in the Department of Pathology at the Yale School of Medicine and a member of both the Yale Combined Program in Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, and the Yale Center for Research on Aging. Her work relies on an interdisciplinary approach, integrating theories and methods from statistical genetics, computational biology, and mathematical demography to develop biomarkers of aging for humans and animal models using high-dimensional omics data. As PI or co-Investigator on multiple NIH-, Foundation-, and University-funded projects, she has extensive experience using systems-level and machine learning approaches to track epigenetic, transcriptomic, and proteomic changes with aging and incorporate this information to develop measures of risk stratification for major chronic diseases, such as cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. Her work also involves development of systems-level outcome measures of aging, aimed at facilitating evaluation for geroprotective interventions. A number of the existing biological aging measures she has developed are being applied in both basic and observational research.​

Gordan Lauc, University of Zagreb

Dr. Gordan Lauc is Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Zagreb Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry. His laboratory performed the first large scale studies of the human plasma glycome (in 2009) and human IgG glycome (in 2011), which were the basis for the subsequent first GWAS of the human plasma and IgG glycomes. He was invited to lecture at numerous international conferences (including FEBS, EMBO, ASBMB, Glyco, etc), elected for visiting professor at the Johns Hopkins University, University of Edinburgh and Edith Cowan University in Perth. In 2011 he was inducted in the prestigious Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars. In 2007 Prof Lauc established Genos Ltd, a private research organisation accredited by the Croatian Ministry of Science, Education and Sport that currently has 28 employees, including 17 researchers. Genos was ranked as #1 in the 2013 survey of The Scientist magazine for “The best place to work for researches” in the category “Industry” and received a Charter of the Republic of Croatia (awarded by the President of Croatia) for an outstanding economic contribution to development of Croatia by commercialization of research results in 2014.​

Daniel Bojar

2020 Foresight Fellow, Harvard Wyss Institute

Daniel is the 2020 Foresight Fellow in Health & Longevity. His background is in structural biology, strengthened by a B.Sc. in biochemistry (University of Tuebingen, Germany, 2014) and a M.Sc. in biophysics (ETH Zurich, Switzerland, 2016) with distinction, enabled him to understand biological processes down to the atomic level. During his doctoral work with Dr. Martin Fussenegger at ETH Zurich, Daniel employed these fundamental insights to genetically re-engineer human cells for therapeutic purposes. Creatively using the principles of synthetic biology, he designed new proteins with a dedicated function – such as a novel caffeine receptor – and used these intricate tools to develop potent new cell-based therapies for diabetes mellitus and Parkinson’s disease. Further, Daniel was distinguished by several prestigious fellowships, such as the Excellence Scholarship and Opportunity Program of ETH Zurich and by the German Academic Scholarship Foundation, as well as in the form of a Selected Young Scientist at the 68th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, an honor extended to the 600 most promising biomedical scientists worldwide. As a postdoctoral fellow with Dr. James J. Collins at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, Daniel harnesses the potency of cutting edge machine learning techniques to elucidate the biological functions of glycans since September 2019. Daniel was the first researcher to devise, develop, and apply methods derived from artificial intelligence to glycans and begin to tame their astounding complexity. In 2020, Daniel, was selected to be part of the prestigious Branco Weiss Fellowship – Society in Science 2020 Fellows, and as such was awarded $106,000 annually for five years to work on connecting machine learning and glycobiology, towards unveiling the inner workings of biology and facilitating biomedical therapies of tomorrow.

Joris Deelen

Max Planck Institute for Ageing

Joris Deelen is leading the research group on Genetics and Biomarkers of Human Ageing at the Max Planck Institute for Ageing Research. The group studies the genetic mechanisms underlying healthy ageing in humans by investigating the effect of genetic variants that are unique to long-lived families on the functioning of pathways implicated in ageing and/or age-related diseases. Moreover, they try to identify and validate biomarkers of healthy ageing using data from large-scale international collaborations of human studies.

Kristen Fortney

BioAge

Kristen leads BIOAGE in its mission to develop a broad pipeline of therapies that target aging in order to increase healthspan and address chronic diseases. Kristen draws from a deep background in aging research and systems biology to develop BIOAGE’s data-driven approach to identify and target the molecular pathways that drive aging. Kristen received her PhD in Medical Biophysics from the University of Toronto, followed by postdoctoral training at Stanford University where she was a fellow of the Ellison Medical Foundation / American Federation for Aging Research. She has over 10 years of experience developing novel bioinformatics approaches for data-driven investigation into the mechanisms of aging and age-related disease, with 18 published papers spanning computational drug discovery, biomarkers of aging, and the genetics of exceptional human longevity.

Felix Faber

Cambridge University

Felix received a B.Sc. and a M.Sc. in physics at Linköping University in Sweden, followed by a Ph.D. in chemistry at the University of Basel. His master’s thesis, which was later published in the International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, was one of the first works that demonstrated successful learning of crystal formation energies. Felix developed machine learning techniques for modeling fundamental quantum mechanical properties. Such properties include energies, forces, and dipole moments of crystals and molecules. In one of his first Ph.D. projects, which was published in Physical Review Letters, Felix used a machine learning model to predict formation energies of almost 2 million Elpasolite crystal structures. This model was also used to identify around 90 potentially thermodynamically stable structures. He was also among those who pioneered the use of quantum mechanical operators directly on machine learning models, which results in improved performance and is a stepping stone towards universal machine learning modeling of quantum mechanical properties. Additionally, Felix dedicated parts of his Ph.D. to benchmarking and comparing the performance of different machine learning models. In one such example Felix and his team, in collaboration with scientists from google, performed one of the most comprehensive comparisons of different machine learning models to date. Felix envisions a research framework where these techniques could be harnessed to understand and model biological and materials systems of varying complexity. Such fundamental models could be used to develop therapeutics, as well as new materials tailored for exhibiting specific properties. To those ends, Felix recently started a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Cambridge, where applying the models that he developed during his Ph.D. to discover new drugs and materials.

Margaretta Colangelo

Longevity Technology

Margaretta Colangelo is a native San Franciscan with over 30 years of experience working in the software industry in Silicon Valley. She has a deep and multifaceted understanding of business, science, and technology, and is highly adept at tracking and forecasting innovation in technology. She has published over 200 articles on AI , DeepTech, and Longevity.

Margaretta is Co-founder and CEO of Jthereum an enterprise Blockchain company and serves on the advisory boards of the AI Precision Health Institute at the University of Hawaii Cancer Center, NaNotics, Robots Go Mental. and on the Executive Board of Directors of the Bring Hope Humanitarian Foundation. She serves on the advisory board of the The Alliance for Longevity Initiatives and is a mentor to company founders in the Foresight Institute Biotech and Health Extension Accelerator.

Margaretta has been at the forefront of emerging technologies throughout her entire career. In the 1990s she was a core member of the team that developed the first Java based secure messaging software for stock trading platforms used by the world’s top multinational investment banks, and influenced important technical specifications and standards, including JDBC and JMS, that have helped advance the technology industry.

Margaretta’s articles have been published multiple times in Forbes, MIT Technology Review Italia, International Journal of Infectious Diseases, Health Management Journal, Outsourcing Pharma, Pharmaceutical Executive, Healthcare IT News, Bahrain Entrepreneur, Asian Robotics Review, and The American Journal of Translational Medicine. Margaretta publishes weekly newsletters on DeepTech, Longevity, and FinTech with hundreds of thousands of subscribers across multiple platforms. Margaretta speaks at AI conferences in the US, Mexico, Brazil, Singapore, Switzerland, Sweden, Portugal, Saudi Arabia, and Oman.

Petr Sramek

Longevitytech.fund

Petr Sramek is Managing Partner of Longevitytech.fund and co-founder of LongevityForum.eu. He is a serial entrepreneur in deep tech for more than 30 years. Petr is building science, funding and business infrastructure to support faster adoption of health-span improving technologies. Petr was Entrepreneur in Residence at Singularity University, co-founder of the Platform on Artificial Intelligence at the Confederation of Industry, AI Startup Incubator founder and a Senator for the Czech Republic in the World Business Angels Investment Forum (WBAF). Petr is also the founder of the AI Awards project. Petr has been featured in the group of 28 AI leaders in the flagship World Intellectual Property Organization study.

Adam Gries

Material World

Adam is a serial entrepreneur and software engineer; he has sold four companies and built apps and games on iOS and Facebook reaching over 80 million users. Having always been passionate about education he is now building products that help people learn on mobile devices.

Joao Pedro De Magalhaes

University of Liverpool

Ageing has a profound impact on human society and modern medicine, yet it remains a major puzzle of biology. The goal of my work is to help understand the genetic, cellular, and molecular mechanisms of ageing. In the long term, I would like my work to help ameliorate age-related diseases and preserve health. No other biomedical field has so much potential to improve human health as research on the basic mechanisms of ageing. Please visit our lab website for further details about our work and publications, or see my TEDx talk.

Thomas Kalil

Schmidt Futures

Tom Kalil is Chief Innovation Officer at Schmidt Futures. In this role, Tom leads initiatives to harness technology for societal challenges, improve science policy, and identify and pursue 21st century moonshots.

Prior to Schmidt Futures, Tom served in the White House for two Presidents (Obama and Clinton), helping to design and launch national science and technology initiatives in areas such as nanotechnology, the BRAIN initiative, data science, materials by design, robotics, commercial space, high-speed networks, access to capital for startups, high-skill immigration, STEM education, learning technology, startup ecosystems, and the federal use of incentive prizes.
From 2001 to 2008, Kalil was Special Assistant to the Chancellor for Science and Technology at UC Berkeley. He launched a program called Big [email protected], which provide grants to student-led teams committed to solving important problems at home and abroad. In 2007 and 2008, Kalil was the Chair of the Global Health Working Group for the Clinton Global Initiative, where he developed new public and private sector initiatives in areas such as maternal and child health, under-nutrition, and vaccines.

Prior to joining the Clinton White House, Tom was a trade specialist at the Washington offices of Dewey Ballantine, where he represented the Semiconductor Industry Association on U.S.-Japan trade issues and technology policy. He also served as the principal staffer to Gordon Moore in his capacity as Chair of the SIA Technology Committee.

Tom received a B.A. in political science and international economics from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, and completed graduate work at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy.

Karl Pfleger

Angel Investor, Aging Biotech.info

Karl Pfleger, PhD (Stanford CS, Machine Learning) now focuses on aging & longevity after a successful tech career (mySimon, Google). A long-time donor to the Buck Institute and SENS Foundation, he is also an angel investor who has backed over 15 aging-related startups. He is the creator of AgingBiotech.info, a free public resource to track the commercialization progress of the aging biotech sector and related information.

James Peyer

Cambrian Bio

James Peyer is the Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder of Cambrian Biopharma. He also serves as the Chairman of the Board of Sensei Biotherapeutics and holds multiple board and executive roles across Cambrian’s pipeline. He has spent his entire life dedicated to the mission of finding ways of preventing people from getting diseases like cancer and Alzheimer’s instead of waiting for people to get sick. James was previously Founder and Managing Partner at Apollo Ventures, the first global longevity-focused venture capital firm, investing across the US and Europe. Prior to Apollo, James was a biotech R&D specialist at the New York office of McKinsey & Company, serving major pharmaceutical clients. He earned his PhD in stem cell biology at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center as a National Science Foundation Fellow and received his B.A. with special honors from the University of Chicago.

Matt Kaeberlein

 University of Washington

Dr. Matt Kaeberlein is a Professor of Pathology, Adjunct Professor of Genome Sciences, and Adjunct Professor of Oral Health Sciences at the University of Washington. His research interests are focused on basic mechanisms of aging in order to facilitate translational interventions that promote healthspan and improve quality of life. He has published nearly 200 papers in top scientific journals and has been recognized by several prestigious awards, including a Breakthroughs in Gerontology Award, an Alzheimer’s Association Young Investigator Award, an Ellison Medical Foundation New Scholar in Aging Award, a Murdock Trust Award, a Pioneer in Aging Award, and the Vincent Cristofalo Rising Star in Aging Research.
His contributions have also been recognized with Fellow status in the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Aging Association, and the Gerontological Society of America. Dr.
Kaeberlein is a past President of the American Aging Association and has served on their Executive Committee and Board of Directors since 2012. He has also served as a member of the Board of Directors
for the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology and is currently the Chair of the Biological Sciences Section of the Gerontological Society of America. Dr. Kaeberlein serves on the editorial boards for several journals, including Science and eLife. Dr. Kaeberlein’s scientific discoveries have generated substantial public interest, with featured stories in major media outlets including appearing on the front
page of the New York Times, the Today Show, CNN, the UK Telegraph, Popular Science, Time Magazine, Scientific American, NPR, USA Today, National Geographic, and many others. In addition to his primary appointments, Dr. Kaeberlein is the co-Director of the University of Washington Nathan Shock Center of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging, the founding Director of the Healthy Aging and Longevity Research Institute at the University of Washington, and founder and co-Director of the Dog Aging Project.

Martin Borch Jensen

Gordian Bio

I work to make aging a good thing.

Our bodies have the capacity for rejuvenation, but we haven’t yet mastered the biology that makes this happen. Biology is full of feedback loops that cause non-linear responses, which makes it difficult to go from experimental observations to reliably producing specific physiological outcomes.

My focus is on developing technologies to interrogate the full network of aging processes inside living organisms. This includes multiplexed measurement of complex states, interpretable perturbations, and context-aware data models.

Previously, I was an academic working on a range of cellular mechanisms involved in aging: mitochondrial function, NAD metabolism, DNA damage signaling and other stress responses.

Brian Kennedy

Buck Institute

Dr. Kennedy earned his PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is well known for his work during his graduate studies with Leonard Guarente, PhD, which led to the discovery that sirtuins (SIR2) modulate aging. He performed postdoctoral studies at the MGH Cancer Center associated with Harvard Medical School. From 2001 to 2010, he held a faculty position at the University of Washington. He was the president and CEO of the Buck Institute from 2010 to 2016 and remains a professor at the Institute. In addition, he is a visiting professor in medicine and healthy aging at National University Singapore, an adjunct professor in the Davis School of Gerontology at the University of Southern California, and an affiliate professor in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Washington. Dr. Kennedy has published more than 160 papers in prestigious journals, including Cell, Science, and Nature. He serves as co-editor-in-chief of Aging Cell and is on the editorial board of a number of other scientific journals. He also routinely provides lectures to the public and is active in writing opinion pieces on aging in public media outlets around the world. More recently, Dr. Kennedy has become active in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical arena, serving as a consultant for several companies. He is currently on the board of directors of three companies, including acting as board chair of Mt. Tam Pharmaceuticals. He has also completed research projects for several biotechnology companies.

Vera Gorbunova

Co-director Rochester Aging Research Center, University of Rochester

Vera Gorbunova is an endowed Professor of Biology at the University of Rochester and a co-director of the Rochester Aging Research Center. Her research is focused on understanding the mechanisms of longevity and genome stability and on the studies of exceptionally long-lived mammals. Dr. Gorbunova earned her B.Sc. degrees at Saint Petersburg State University, Russia, and her Ph.D. at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel. Dr. Gorbunova pioneered comparative biology approach to study aging and identified rules that control the evolution of tumor suppressor mechanisms depending on the species lifespan and body mass. Dr. Gorbunova also investigates the role of Sirtuin proteins in maintaining genome stability. More recently the focus of her research has been on the longest-lived rodent species the naked mole rats and the blind mole rat. Dr. Gorbunova identified high molecular weight hyaluronan as the key mediator of cancer-resistance in the naked mole rat. Her work received awards from the Ellison Medical Foundation, the Glenn Foundation, American Federation for Aging Research, and from the National Institutes of Health. Her work was awarded the Cozzarelli Prize from PNAS, the prize for research on aging from ADPS/Alianz, France, Prince Hitachi Prize in Comparative Oncology, Japan, and Davey prize from Wilmot Cancer Center.

Vadim N Gladyshev

Harvard University

Vadim N. Gladyshev is a professor at Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and an expert and pioneer in antioxidant/redox biology. He is known for his characterization of the human selenoprotein encoded by 25 genes. He has conducted studies on whether organisms can acquire cellular damage from their food; the role selenium plays as a micro-nutrient with significant health benefits. In 2013 he won the NIH Pioneer Award.

Irina M CONBOY

UC Berkeley

A key direction of my laboratory is to understand age-imposed and pathological changes in molecular compositions of systemic and local environments of adult stem cells and to calibrate these to health – youth. In the past few years this direction has been ramified into synthetic biology, CRISPR technologies, bio-orhtogonal proteomics and development of innovative digital bio-sensors that we collaboratively applied to the fields of aging and diagnostics of genetic diseases. Success in this research will improve our understanding of the determinants of homeostatic health and will enable novel rational approaches to treat a number of degenerative, fibrotic, metabolic and inflammatory diseases, as a class.

Liam Berryman

Nelumbo Inc

Liam is CEO and Co-Founder at Nelumbo, a company making physical products resistant to the elements, higher performance, and environmentally sustainable by creatively applying nanostructured materials. As CEO, Liam has led Nelumbo from garage start-up to an emerging company solving major problems for top tier clients. Nelumbo has received greater than $17M in private funding, is developing multiple products that provide breakthrough results for customers and the climate and is forging a defining culture to enable continued excellence in materials innovation and commercialization. Liam is also a personal advisor and mentor to select CEOs building big, unique ventures. He supports areas including deep technology and climate spaces, market analysis and financial planning, fundraising, clarifying story, public speaking, strategic deal structuring, and building growth teams.

Liam is a proud member of the Young President’s Organization (YPO), the Thiel Fellowship, and Forbes 30 under 30 for Energy. He has been a featured speaker at a variety of energy and climate conferences, including: Cleantech Forum, European Venture Fair, NREL Industry Growth Forum, Energy & Impact Symposium, Cleantech Open, Verge, Hive, National Investment Banking Association (NIBA), SinBerBEST, and the Cleantech University Prize.

Liam attended UC Berkeley for Chemical Engineering and worked as a lead researcher in the Design for Nanomanufacturing Lab. His research led to a novel synthesis process for polymer microspheres that was patented and later published in Progress in Organic Coatings.

Liam is a lifetime reader, runner, and surfer. He grew up on the coast of Northern California and currently lives in Berkeley.

Glen Weyl

RadicalxChange

Glen Weyl works to collaboratively envision, design, experiment with and organize around next generation political economic institutions. He serves at Microsoft’s Office of the Chief Technology Officer Political Economist and Social Technologist (OCTOPEST), where he helps design and implement technology ambitious corporate social commitments. He is Founder and Chair of the RadicalxChange Foundation, a non-profit that coordinates a global social movement for social technology. Previously he was 2007 Valedictorian of Princeton University, received his PhD in economics from there in 2008, was Junior Fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows, Assistant Professor of Economics and Law at University of Chicago, co-author with Eric Posner of Radical Markets: Uprooting Capitalism and Democracy for a Just Society and co-author and technical lead of the Edmund J. Safra Center Rapid Response Task Force on Covid-19 that was a foundation of the Biden administration’s covid-19 response plan. In 2018, he was one of Bloomberg Businessweek’s 50 most influential people, WIRED’s 25 people shaping the next 25 years of technology and Coindesk’s 10 most influential people in blockchain.

Robin Hanson

George Mason University

Robin Hanson is associate professor of economics at George Mason University, and research associate at the Future of Humanity Institute of Oxford University. He has a doctorate in social science from California Institute of Technology, master’s degrees in physics and philosophy from the University of Chicago, and nine years experience as a research programmer, at Lockheed and NASA.

Professor Hanson has 4510 citations, a citation h-index of 33, and over ninety academic publications, including in Algorithmica, Applied Optics, Communications of the ACM, Economics Letters, Economica, Econometrica, Economics of Governance, Foundations of Physics, IEEE Intelligent Systems, Information Systems Frontiers, Innovations, International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence, Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, Journal of Evolution and Technology, Journal of Law Economics and Policy, Journal of Political Philosophy, Journal of Prediction Markets, Journal of Public Economics, Maximum Entropy and Bayesian Methods, Medical Hypotheses, Proceedings of the Royal Society, Public Choice, Science, Social Epistemology, Social Philosophy and Policy, and Theory and Decision.

Oxford University Press published his book The Age of Em: Work, Love and Life When Robots Rule the Earth in June 2016, and his book The Elephant in the Brain: Hidden Motives in Everyday Life, co-authored with Kevin Simler, in January, 2018. Professor Hanson has 1007 media mentions, given 370 invited talks, and his blog OvercomingBias.com has had eight million visits.

Professor Hanson has pioneered prediction markets, also known as information markets and idea futures, since 1988. He was the first to write in detail about creating and subsidizing markets to gain better estimates on a wide variety of important topics. He was a principal architect of the first internal corporate markets, at Xanadu in 1990, of the first web markets, the Foresight Exchange since 1994, of DARPA’s Policy Analysis Market, from 2001 to 2003, and of IARPA’s combinatorial markets DAGGRE and SCICAST from 2010 to 2015. Professor Hanson developed new technologies for conditional, combinatorial, and intermediated trading, and studied insider trading, manipulation, and other foul play. He has written and spoken widely on the application of idea futures to business and policy, and has advised many ventures. He suggests “futarchy”, a form of governance based on prediction markets.

Robin has diverse research interests, with papers on spatial product competition, health incentive contracts, group insurance, product bans, evolutionary psychology and bioethics of health care, voter information incentives, incentives to fake expertise, Bayesian classification, agreeing to disagree, self-deception in disagreement, probability elicitation, wiretaps, image reconstruction, the history of science prizes, reversible computation, the origin of life, the survival of humanity, very long term economic growth, growth given machine intelligence, and interstellar colonization. He coined the phrase “The Great Filter” to analyze why the universe looks so dead.

Cyrus Hodes

Global Partnership on AI

 

Cyrus most recently served as Advisor to the UAE Minister of Artificial Intelligence, currently working on projects that will positively impact the world through the use of AI and help shape the upcoming global governance of AI. Being passionate about drastically disruptive technologies, Cyrus previously led and still advises robotics and biotech ventures. In 2015, he co-founded the AI Initiative, which he managed by engaging a wide range of global stakeholders to study, discuss and help shape the governance of AI. The AI Initiative did, and continue to do so, through various international policy platforms (OEDC, HKS Forums, Japanese MIC, French Parliament, etc.) as well as AI ethics and safety initiatives. Cyrus spearheaded several projects using innovative tools (such as the Global Civic Debate and its multilingual collective intelligence platform on the governance of AI) and works at using AI and Machine Learning to tackle policy issues.

Cyrus is a member of three Committees (Policy, Well Being and General Principles) of the IEEE Global Initiative for Ethical Considerations in Artificial Intelligence and Autonomous Systems as well as a Senior Advisor to The Future Society. Cyrus was educated at Sciences Po Paris, where he later was a Lecturer, holds a M.A. (Hons) from Paris II University in Defense, Geostrategy and Industrial Dynamics and a M.P.A. for Harvard Kennedy School.

Dr. Alex Zhavoronkov

Insilico Medicine

Dr. Alex Zhavoronkov is the CEO of Insilico Medicine, a leader in the next-generation artificial intelligence technologies for drug discovery, biomarker development, and aging research. At Insilico he pioneered the applications of generative adversarial networks and reinforcement learning techniques for generating novel molecular structures with the desired properties. He was the first to develop the deep-learned multi-modal predictors of age for drug and biomarker development. He set up the R&D centers in 6 countries including the United Kingdom, Korea, Russia, Hong Kong and Taiwan and launched multiple B2B and B2C research platforms including Young.AI. Prior to founding Insilico Medicine, he worked in senior roles at ATI Technologies (acquired by AMD in 2006), NeuroG Neuroinformatics, the Biogerontology Research Foundation and YLabs.AI and established AgeNet.net competitions and Diversity.AI initiative. Since 2012 he published over 120 peer-reviewed research papers and books including “The Ageless Generation: How Biomedical Advances Will Transform the Global Economy” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013).

He is the co-organizer of the Annual Aging Research for Drug Discovery Forum and the Artificial Intelligence and Blockchain for Healthcare Forum at the Basel Life/EMBO, one of Europe’s largest industry events in drug discovery. Dr. Zhavoronkov holds two bachelor degrees from Queen’s University, a master’s in Biotechnology from Johns Hopkins University, and a PhD in Physics and Mathematics from Moscow State University. He is the adjunct professor of artificial intelligence at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging.

Senior Fellows

Our Senior Fellows in Action

EXISTENTIAL HOPE TRACK

Adam Brown

I’m a theoretical physicist at Stanford, interested in early universe cosmology, inflation, black holes, and assorted other topics. My academic papers can be found on the arXiv…

 

 

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AGI BENEFICENCE

Richard Mallah

Richard is Director of AI Projects at emerging technology beneficence nonprofit Future of Life Institute, aiming to keep AI robust and beneficial to humankind.

He is also an advisor to other startups, nonprofits/NGOs, and the public sector globally, where he advises on AI, AI safety, AI policy, AI ethics, knowledge management, and sustainability…

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CHEMICAL COMPUTING

Prof. Lee Cronin

Lee Cronin was born in the UK and was fascinated with science and technology from an early age getting his first computer and chemistry set when he was 8 years old. This is when he first started thinking about programming chemistry and looking for inorganic aliens. He went to the University of York where he completed both…

 

 

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LONGEVITY INVESTING & DATA ANALYSIS

Dr. Karl Pfleger, PhD

Karl Pfleger, PhD (Stanford CS, Machine Learning) now focuses on aging & longevity after a successful tech career (mySimon, Google). A long-time donor to the Buck Institute and SENS Foundation…

 

 

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ARTIFICIAL MOLECULAR MACHINES

Professor David A Leigh

David Leigh is a scientist who designs and synthesises artificial molecular motors and machines from first principles. He has made a number of notable contributions to the field, including the use of light-sensitive molecules to make small droplets of liquid move uphill. David also developed a tiny molecular machine that mirrors the function of the ribosome, the protein factory of our cells.

His pioneering work has significantly improved the future…

 

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CRYPTOGRAPHY

Zooko Wilcox

Zooko Wilcox is the founder and CEO of the Electric Coin Company. He is one of the original cypherpunks. Zooko is a long-serving technologist and entrepreneur. His experience spans open, decentralized systems; cryptography; information security; and startups. In more than 25 years in the industry, Zooko has contributed to an array of projects — many of which champion privacy implementations — including…

 

 

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CONSTRUCTOR THEORY

Chiara Marletto

Chiara Marletto is a Research Fellow working at the Physics Department, University of Oxford. Within Wolfson, she is an active member of the Quantum Cluster and of the New Frontiers Quantum Hub. 

Her research is in theoretical physics, with special emphasis on Quantum Theory of Computation, Information Theory, Thermodynamics…

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HEALTH EXTENSION

Morgan Levine, PhD

Morgan Levine is a ladder-rank Assistant Professor in the Department of Pathology at the Yale School of Medicine and a member of both the Yale Combined Program in Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, and the Yale Center for …

 

 

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PREDICTION MARKETS

Robin D Hanson

Robin Hanson is associate professor of economics at George Mason University, and research associate at the Future of Humanity Institute of Oxford University. He has a doctorate in social science from California Institute of Technology, master’s degrees in physics and philosophy from the University of Chicago, and nine years experience as a research programmer, at Lockheed and NASA…

 

 

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CRYOPRESERVATION

Gregory M. Fahy, Ph.D.

-Designed and led the TRIIM trial; Published the first report of thymus regeneration in a normal human; Granted patents on methods for and applications of human thymus regeneration

–Fellow of the American Aging Association (since 2005), Former Director of the American Aging Association…

 

 

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COMPUTATION

Mark S. Miller, Ph.D.

Mark S. Miller, Chief Scientist at Agoric, is a pioneer of agoric (market-based secure distributed) computing and smart contracts, the main designer of the E and Dr. SES distributed persistent object-capability programming languages, inventor of Miller Columns, an architect of the Xanadu hypertext …

 

 

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CHEMISTRY

Martin Edelstein, Ph.D.

Dr. Edelstein is a Non-executive board member for Agua Via Ltd., serving as science advisor to the board. He is a founding member and CTO of Covalent Industrial Technologies, LLC which develops bottom-up nanotechnology-based products for environmental and medical markets. Prior to founding Covalent Martin was …

 

 

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POLICY

Christine L. Peterson

Christine Peterson is Co-founder and former President of Foresight Institute. She lectures and writes about nanotechnology, AI, and longevity. Christine co-facilitates Foresight’s technical competitions and Feynman Prizes in Nanotechnology. She is co-author of Unbounding the Future: the Nanotechnology Revolution …

 

 

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POLITICAL SCIENCE

Samo Burja

Samo Burja is the Founder and President of Bismarck Analysis, a political risk consulting firm based in San Francisco that specializes in institutional analysis for clients in North America and Europe. Bismarck uses the foundational sociological research that Samo and his team have conducted over the past decade to deliver …

 

 

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PHILOSOPHY

Anders Sandberg

Anders Sandberg has a background in computer science and neuroscience, but is since 2006 a member of the Faculty of Philosophy at University of Oxford. There, at the Future of Humanity Institute, he investigates management of low-probability high-impact risks, estimating the capabilities of future technologies …

 

 

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APPLIED PHYSICS

Creon Levit

Since 2015 Creon has worked at Planet Labs, where he is the Chief Technologist, Director or R&D, and a Planet Fellow. Prior to that, he worked at NASA Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, where he was one of the founders of the NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) division, co-PI on the Virtual Wind…

 

 

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NANOTECHNOLOGY

Rob Meagley, Ph.D.

Dr. Meagley is presently CEO, CTO and resident “Mad Scientist” at ONE Nanotechnologies, a company founded to invent, develop and market photonic nanodevices and device arrays for biomarker characterization and related technology. Prior to forming ONE Nanotechnologies and following post-doctoral research at …

 

 

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Brad Templeton

Brad Templeton is currently chair of Computing & Networks at Singularity University, and Chairman Emeritus and futurist of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), the leading cyberspace civil rights foundation. He advised Google’s team developing self-driving cars, and writes about such cars at robocars.com. He also advises Starship on delivery robots and…

 

 

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Fellowship class of 2022

The Foresight Fellowship is a one-year program committed to giving change-makers the support to accelerate their bold ideas into the future.

Our mission is to catalyze collaboration among leading young scientists, engineers, and innovators who are working on emerging new technologies that have the power to transform society. Since 1993 Foresight Institute has been rewarding those who are making strides in the field of Nanotechnology with the Feynman Prize. In 2016, one of our former Feynman Prize winners, Sir J. Fraser Stoddart, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work with molecular machines. We believe that providing a strong network, knowledge exchange, and platform for fellows early can significantly advance their capability to make important strides in a variety of fields. During the 1 year program, Fellows are invited to engage in events, connect with current and former fellows and mentors, and help each other succeed with their endeavors. 

Biotech & Health Extension

Juanita Matthews

Currently, she is doing a postdoc at Tufts University with Dr. Michael Levin at the Allen Discovery Center. Also she is working to understand novel bioelectric controls of cell-cell interactions. Specifically, ion channel modulation of glioblastoma and stem cell differentiation. Her other projects have involved altering cellular resting membrane potentials to control the innervation of murine muscle cells grown in 2D and in ex vivo explants. She also work on methods for investigating primary cellular cognition.

Yuri Deigin

Yuri Deigin, MBA is a biotech entrepreneur with a focus on early-stage translation of scientific breakthroughs into therapies. He has over a decade of drug discovery and development experience, and a track record of outlicensing products to Big Pharma.

 

 

Maryna Polyakova

Currently, she is using neuroimaging, fluid biomarkers and neuropsychological testing to define between different subtypes of disease, with an ultimate aim to improve treatments.

Maryna is also interested in Personalized solutions that predict treatment efficiency in depression and progression of neurodegenerative diseases.

Beside this she is currently teaching introduction to medicine with a focus on digital health in HTW Berlin and giving lectures on basics of nervous activity, depression and schizophrenia at the University of Leipzig and Max Planck.

Tinka Vidovic

Medical doctor and Ph.D. student interested in Molecular medicine, Bioinformatics, Machine learning, and Anti-aging research.

Nikola T. Markov

Nikola is a bioinformatician at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging. He is interested in the mechanisms of aging with special emphasis on brain aging. He applies multi-omics systems approaches to untangle the process of normal and pathological aging.

Alexander Fedintsev

Alexander Fedintsev is a scientist and machine learning engineer. His scientific background lies in the field of bioinformatics, statistics, and machine learning. Alexander earned his M.S. in computer science from the National Research University “Moscow Power EngineeringInstitute”. Alexander worked in the Institute of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy as a bioinformatician. He also collaborated with professor Alexey Moskalev’s lab on aging research. After quitting academia, Alexander switched to machine learning engineering however he continued collaborating on aging research with professor Moskalev. He developed a highly accurate non-invasive biomarker of aging based on markers of the cardiovascular system. Now his research interest is mainly focused on the role of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the aging process. He and professor Moskalev recently suggested treating non-enzymatic modifications of long-living proteins (mostly, in the ECM) as a 10th hallmark of aging.

Mac Davis

Machiavelli is a biohacker, entrepreneur and gene therapy activist developing gene therapy for the masses. He’s worked and researched in analytic neurochemistry, bioprocessing, gene therapy and investing.

Nora Khaldi

Dr Nora Khaldi is an award-winning TEDx speaker and a highly published mathematician and scientist. Nora’s revolutionary and innovative ideas and inventions have been awarded and recognised by the likes of Forbes, Wired and the EU Commission.
After leaving her academic career in early 2014, Nora decided to focus exclusively on disrupting the way therapeutic molecules were being discovered. She thus created Nuritas™, the first company in the world to introduce artificial intelligence (AI) to the food arena with the aim of creating the future of food and personalised nutrition, in a nutshell, the future of health. Based in Dublin, Ireland, Nuritas™ is revolutionising health and food systems through the accelerated discovery of therapeutic health-benefiting molecules from food.

Zvonimir Vrselja

Zvonimir Vrselja received his M.D. and Ph.D. from J. J. Strossmayer University in Croatia. After completing his graduate education, he started his postdoctoral training at Yale University in the United States of America. He currently holds the position of Associate Research Scientist in the Sestan Laboratory at the Yale School of Medicine. His research focuses on the development of a system that preserves global anatomical organization, as well as cellular organization, attenuates cell death, and restores neuronal, glial, and vascular functionality, along with global metabolism, in isolated large mammalian brains several hours after death.

Cody Rasmussen-Ivey

Cody is postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. His research interests include Bioinformatics, gene therapy, and regenerative medicine.

Delphine Larrieu

Dr Delphine Larrieu completed her PhD in 2010 at the University of Grenoble, France. She then undertook her postdoctoral training with Professor Steve Jackson at the University of Cambridge, with independent funding from EMBO and from the Medical Research Council. She then obtained a Sir Henry Dale Wellcome Trust fellowship, allowing her to set up her own lab at the Cambridge Institute for Medical Research.

Delphine’s lab is interested in understanding mechanisms driving rare premature ageing syndromes called progeria, and in identifying new ways to treat these diseases.

Iosif Gershteyn

Iosif M. Gershteyn is a serial entrepreneur with a track record of founding companies in the biologics and medical device industries. Upon completing his graduate studies in international economics and finance at Brandeis University in 2009, he started his career in asset management working on long-term qualitative investment strategies. Subsequently, he worked in corporate strategy (including mergers and acquisitions) and ultimately embarked on a career in technology entrepreneurship. Alongside his primary occupation, he pursued interests in biology (neuroscience, immunology and physiology) after the completion of his formal education. These interests led him to found the Immunodietica project, which generates published research in the fields of immunology and computational systems biology. Since 2016, he has chaired the Ajax Biomedical Foundation and believes that computational systems have underexplored promise in multiple applications of human health, finance, and complex systems analysis. He is currently CEO of ImmuVia, an oncology therapeutics company.

Bradley English

Since you ‘cannot change what you cannot measure’, Brad endeavors to bring accessible, affordable, and scientifically sound aging biomarkers to the general public. As a researcher, Brad investigates these age-associated changes — epigenetic methylation marks — looking for why they accompany such profound, unprecedented consequences, in both naturally aged tissue and reprogrammed cells.

Tatyana Dobreva

Before getting her hands dirty in the messy world of biology, Tatyana was pursuing her dream of becoming an astronaut. After completing her degree in electrical engineering, she worked as a signal processing engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Tatyana volunteered her nights and weekends doing research at Caltech in neuroprosthetics and viral engineering to get a grasp on how engineering is used to probe and fix biology at its core – the cell. She then pursued her passion full time and got a PhD from Caltech where she got a chance to work on cell engineering, adeno-associated viruses, and single-cell RNA sequencing. Tatyana is now a CEO and a Co-Founder of ImYoo Inc. which is working on using single-cell immune profiling to connect people with similar immune profiles to share their health journeys.

Nikolina Lauc

Nikolina Lauc is a successful serial entrepreneur with 11 years of experience. She co-founded several startups in the field of fashion, SaaS, travel and biotech, scaling them from one customer to a 3M+ in revenue with no investor backing. She has extended experience in optimising resources, managing small teams in fast-growth environments and building consumer products and services that focus on retention. As an outsider to biotech, she’s already uncovered a novel application for an existing technology that was missed by 50+ scientists in its research lab. She’s the co-inventor of a patent in the women’s health diagnostics space. As Chief Executive Officer, she will be leading GlycanAge in its development from a biomarker in research to a consumer product.

Kai Micah Mills

Kai Micah Mills is a serial entrepreneur with over a decade of experience building and scaling tech companies, most recently Branch Technologies. His focus is now in the cryonics field with his new company Cryopets, constructing an animal hospital and cryonics facility hybrid to advance the science of full-body cryopreservation for pets and humans alike.

Matthew McAteer

Matthew McAteer is a researcher, engineer, and entrepreneur with years of experience in biotech. Matthew has worked in labs addressing age-related diseases at Brown University, MIT, and Mass General Hospital. This was followed by working on using symbolic regression to design cheaper NAD+ precursor production systems. After working with Google’s Tensorflow team on probabilistic programming toolkits, Matthew began building ML pipelines for various biometric authentication and drug discovery startups. He is currently working on ways to make adopting private machine learning best practices easier to adopt for both industry and academia.

Molecular Machines

Dusan Kolarski

Dušan Kolarski studied Chemistry and obtained his B.Sc. degree at the University of Belgrade. He then pursued his M.Sc. studies at ETH Zürich in Switzerland in the group of Prof. Dr. François Diederich. As a master student, he also did an internship at Novartis Institute for BioMedical Research in Basel, Switzerland. In 2020, he obtained his Ph.D. under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Ben L. Feringa at the University of Groningen, where they have developed the field of chronophotopharmacology. His research was focused on using photo-responsive small molecules to reversibly control the circadian clock in mammals by turning drugs` activity ‘on’ and ‘off’ with light.

Giulio Ragazzon

Giulio research interests evolved from photochemistry to molecular machines, self-assembling systems and nanomaterials, as reflected by the interests of his mentors: Credi, Aida, Prins & Prato. He is recipient of multiple awards, including the European Young Chemist Award.

Austin M. Evans

Austin completed his PhD studies at Northwestern University under the direction of William R. Dichtel. As a graduate student, Austin studied two-dimensional polymerizations and the applications of macromolecular sheets. As a postdoctoral scientist in the Nuckolls and Venkataraman labs, Austin is exploring electron dynamics in single-molecule electronics and extended organic solids.

Victor Garcia Lopez

Researcher using the synthetic chemistry toolbox, spectroscopic and photochemical methods to develop new dynamic molecular devices for different applications, including molecular recognition, acceleration of cancer cell death, transport and delivery of cargo at the nanoscale, chemical catalysis, and solar energy conversion.

Yanguang  Zhou

Dr. Yanguang Zhou received his Ph.D. degree with “Ausgezeichnet” in Mechanical Engineering Department at RWTH-Aachen University, as well as his M.Eng. degree and B.Eng. degree in Mechanical Engineering Department at Beihang University and China University of Geoscience, respectively. After graduation from Aachen, he worked as a postdoc research associate and an assistant visiting project scientist at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) before joining HKUST as an assistant professor.

Charlie McTernan

Charlie McTernan is a physical sciences group leader at the Francis Crick Institute in London, and a lecturer at the Department of Chemistry at King’s College London. He is a supramolecular chemist, investigating how artificial molecular machines and metal-organic capsules can be applied in biomedical science.

He joined Prof. David Leigh’s group in 2013, funded by a University of Manchester Dean’s Faculty Award. His doctoral research included the synthesis of artificial molecular machines, switchable catalysts, and rotaxanes.

Ambika Somasundar

Dr. Somasundar earned her Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Pennsylvania State University, with Prof. Ayusman Sen and Prof. Darrell Velegol. As a PCCM postdoctoral fellow, Ambika will be working with Prof. Howard Stone(link is external) on particle penetration into bacterial biofilms.

Kunyu Wang

Kunyu Wang is a PhD candidate at Texas A&M University. He received B.Sc. in Chemistry (Po-Ling class) from Nankai University in 2018, where he studied metal−organic frameworks under the guidance of Prof. Wei Shi. In 2017, he went to Northwestern University as an undergraduate researcher in Dr. T. David Harris’ group to study semiquinoid molecular magnets. In 2018, Kunyu joined Prof. Hong-Cai Zhou’s research group at Texas A&M University. His research interest now focuses on novel strategies to design multi-component and hierarchical metal−organic frameworks. During his study, Kunyu has published 31 peer-reviewed articles, including 8 first/co-first author papers on top-notch journals, such as Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., ACS Materials Lett., ACS Cent. Sci., Trends. Chem., Chem. Soc. Rev., and Matter. Besides, he has presented his research in many conferences, including the RSC Faraday Discussion, Gordon Research Conference, and ACS National Meeting.

Yuanning Feng

After obtaining the gold medal of the National Chemistry Olympiad of China, he started his undergraduate studies at Tsinghua University with an Outstanding Incoming Student Fellowship. Yuanning worked as an undergraduate research assistant on organic synthesis and supramolecular self-assembly in Professor Mei-Xiang Wang’s group at Tsinghua University as well as in Professor Jonathan Sessler’s group at the University of Texas at Austin. In the summer of 2016, he completed his Bachelor’s Degree in Chemical Biology as a Tsinghua Xuetang Talent Fellow under the supervision of Professor Xi Zhang with a research project on supra-amphiphiles. After that, Yuanning joined Professor Fraser Stoddart’s group at Northwestern University, working on artificial molecular machines and graduated with a PhD Degree in August 2021. He used to spend a little time with Professor Douglas Philp (University of St Andrews) working on a supramolecular polymer incorporating systems chemistry and mentor an undergraduate student with Professor Dong Jun Kim (University of New South Wales). He is now carrying out multiple research projects as a postdoctoral research fellow in the group.

Simon Krause

Dr Simon Krause is a chemist working at the intersection of organic, inorganic, physical, and materials chemistry. He studied chemistry at the University of Nottingham (UK) and Technische Universität Dresden (Germany). In 2019 he obtained his PhD at TU Dresden under the supervision of Prof Stefan Kaskel in the field of negative gas adsorption of flexible metal-organic frameworks. From 2019-2020 he worked in the filed of light-driven molecular motors and switches as a Feodor Lynen post-doctoral research fellow of the Alexander von Humboldt foundation in the group of Prof Ben Feringa at the University of Groningen (Nl). Since 2021 he is a group leader at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart (Ger) supported by a Liebig Fellowship researching in the field of framework-embedded molecular machines. If not in the lab you can find him on a lacrosse field, slamming about science or behind a camera.

Stefan Borsley

Stefan is an experienced researcher investigating non-equilibrium molecular machines for catalysis and movement. 

Dionis Minev

Dionis Minev truly values the creative design process, whether he’s using it to produce a beautiful painting or to build a new DNA structure. He is the team lead on the Crisscross Nanosciences Validation Project and is working with his team to create a rapid, low-cost, point-of-care diagnostic device.

Ph.D., Engineering Sciences, Harvard University, 2020; M.Sc., Medical Technology and Engineering, Technical University of Munich, 2015; B.Sc., Mechanical Engineering, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 2012

Dr. Larissa K. S. von Krbek

Larissa studied chemistry at Freie Universität Berlin, Germany, having worked in the groups of Prof. Dr. Hans-Ulrich Reissig on carbohydrate-mimetics synthesis, Prof. Dr. Beate Paulus on DFT calculations of crown-ether/ammonium pseudorotaxanes, and Prof. Dr. Christoph A. Schalley on multivalent supramolecular complexes. She was awarded a fellowship of the German Academic Foundation to do her PhD studies on the thermodynamic analysis of multivalent crown-ether/ammonium systems in the group of Prof. Dr. Christoph A. Schalley. In 2016, she obtained a Dr. rer. nat. in chemistry.

During her following postdoctoral stay in the group of Prof. Jonathan Nitschke at the University of Cambridge (2017–2020), she was working on stimuli responsive metal-organic cages and combining cages with classical supramolecular crown-ether/ammonium motives. She was funded by a Feodor Lynen Research Fellowship of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

In Summer 2020, Larissa moved to Bonn to start her independent career working in the field of systems chemistry and out-of-equilibrium self-assembly with a Liebig Fellowship (Fonds der Chemischen Industrie) and later the Emmy Noether Programme (German Science Foundation).

 

David August

2022 Foresight Fellow in Molecular Weaving

David obtained his MChem degree and PhD at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland where he worked on the development of catalytic coordination cages with Dr Paul Lusby. In 2016 he took up a post doctoral position within the group of Prof. David Leigh at the University of Manchester, UK where, in June 2021, he was promoted to Lecturer within the same group. His work focuses on the formation of complex molecular topologies including knots, links and woven materials. His work on the formation of a molecular fabric was shortlisted for the 2021 Times Higher Education Research Project of the Year (STEM) and holds the Guinness World Record for the World’s finest fabric.

 

 

Intelligent Cooperation

Ben Garfinkel

Ben’s research interests include the security and privacy implications of artificial intelligence, the causes of interstate war, and the methodological challenge of forecasting and reducing technological risks.

He is a Research Fellow at the Future of Humanity Insitute and a DPhil student at Oxford’s Department of Politics and International Relations. He previously earned a degree in Physics and in Mathematics and Philosophy from Yale University.

Rosie Campbell

Rosie Campbell is a Technical Program Manager at OpenAI, where she leads a team of safety specialists working on the responsible use of large language models. Previously, she was Head of Safety-Critical AI at the Partnership on AI, where she focused on responsible publication practices for increasingly advanced AI research. Before that, Rosie was the Assistant Director of the Center for Human-Compatible AI (CHAI)—a technical AI safety research group at UC Berkeley working towards provably beneficial AI—and continues to advise the group on strategy and operations. Before that, Rosie worked as a research engineer at BBC R&D, a multidisciplinary research lab based in the UK. There, she worked on emerging technologies for media and broadcasting, including an award-winning project exploring the use of AI in media production.

Philipp Koellinger

Philipp is a professor in social science genetics at the  La Follette School of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin Madison and also hold an appointment at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam at the Department of Economics.

His research investigates how genes influence economic behavior, and how insights into the genetic architecture of behavioral outcomes can inform social and medical research. Some of his work also explores how the brain mediates relationships between genes and human behavior. He is the one of the principal investigators and co-founders of the Social Science Genetic Association Consortium (SSGAC), the BIG BEAR Consortium, and the Externalizing Consortium.

Philipp is a co-founder of DeSci Labs and President of the DeSci Foundation.

Joshua Tan

Josh is a mathematician and computer scientist working on the intersections between AI and governance. He is the executive director of the Metagovernance Project (metagov.org), a practitioner fellow at Stanford’s Digital Civil Society Lab, and a DPhil student in computer science at the University of Oxford.

Jamie Joyce

Jamie is the founder and Executive Director of the Society Library – a non-profit that creates structured knowledge databases of media concerning debates and discussions around complex social issues. Her goal is to improve humanity’s relationship with information online: in educational, epistemological, and political contexts.

Projects include: Great American Debate (concerning climate change), Internet Government, and COVIDConvo. She’s also interested in the question of how we can engineer new media and societal institutions to meet the demands (and rise to meet the challenges) of the information age.

Jamie has a background in international sustainable development. She oversaw 30 projects in more than 20 countries and served as a representative to the United Nations on behalf of the NGO she served. Jamie is also currently on the board of Wikitongues, a non-profit organization creating a seedbank of the world’s 7000 languages and seeding revitalization efforts around the world.

 

Tushant Ja (TJ)

TJ is a research scholar at the Future of Humanity Institute. With a software engineering background, he has worked in research related to ethical and evolutionary aspects of AI progress, and the value alignment problem.

Matjaz Leonardis

Matjaž has been working with David Deutsch to create a better explanation of and elaborate on the further consequences of a theorem Popper and Miller published in 1983. In particular, Matjaž’ work allows a new perspective on Bayesianism that calls into question the usual interpretation of Bayesian updating.

Georgios Kaissis

Georgios is an assistant professor and consultant radiologist at the Technical University of Munich where he work at the Institute for Artificial Intelligence in Medicine and the Institute of Radiology. He also lead OpenMined Research.

Georgios obtained his medical and doctoral degrees from LMU Munich, his Master’s in Business Administration for Healthcare from FAU Nuremberg and his radiology board certification at TU Munich. He did a postdoc in AI for medical imaging at the Department of Computing at Imperial College London, where he remain as a Research Associate.

His research interests revolve around secure and private artificial intelligence, specifically differential privacy, and their applications in the domain of medicine and radiology in particular.

Lawrence Wu

Lawrence is a developer and technical entrepreneur with a background in pure math, statistics, algorithms, systems, and finance. He holds computer science and mathematics degrees from MIT and has been a software engineer at Cruise Automation, SoundHound, and Folsom Labs (acquired by Aurora Solar).

Recent interests include a more social science and transdisciplinary mindset, seeing coordination problems as a bottleneck to realizing humanity’s global optimum. Along these lines, Atoms is a recent initiative focused on coordinating and resourcing research using Web3 and cryptoeconomics.

Existential Hope

Romain Fonteyne

He is a rover operations preparator on the ExoMars program at the European Space Agency. Romain have authored and co-authored about 10 publications. Recognized by Forbes for the 30 Under 30 Europe list of 2021, and recipient of the International Giuseppe Sciacca Award for Science and Research in 2021. He was also described as a French Research Engineer of the Future honouree by L’Usine Nouvelle in 2019. Romain graduated from the Institut Polytechnique des Sciences Avancées (IPSA) with a Master’s degree in Aerospace Engineering in 2019, and from Politecnico di Torino with a Master’s degree in Space Systems Engineering in 2020. He also hold 7 recognized certifications in Machine Learning and Deep Learning.

Ales Flidr

Starting Master’s in economic history at Oxford with a focus on past transformative technologies, trying to learn lessons for the ones to come.
Previously worked as research assistant at DeepMind and the Future of Humanity Institute in Oxford.

Fellowship class of 2021

The Foresight Fellowship is a one-year program committed to giving change-makers the support to accelerate their bold ideas into the future.

Our mission is to catalyze collaboration among leading young scientists, engineers, and innovators who are working on emerging new technologies that have the power to transform society. Since 1993 Foresight Institute has been rewarding those who are making strides in the field of Nanotechnology with the Feynman Prize. In 2016, one of our former Feynman Prize winners, Sir J. Fraser Stoddart, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work with molecular machines. We believe that providing a strong network, knowledge exchange, and platform for fellows early can significantly advance their capability to make important strides in a variety of fields. During the 1 year program, During the 1 year program, Fellows are invited to engage in events, connect with current and former fellows and mentors, and help each other succeed with their endeavors. 

Biotech & Health Extension

JJ Ben-Joseph

2021 Foresight Fellow in Biosecurity and Artificial Intelligence

JJ Ben-Joseph has spent much of his professional career in the confluence of security and artificial intelligence. As a member of B.Next, In-Q-Tel’s biosecurity practice, he guides and invests in artificial intelligence startups to advance national security. He is a technical contributior to artificial intelligence projects, architecture and policy mostly in pandemic response. Mr. Ben-Joseph is an Emerging Leader in Biosecurity Fellow at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security for 2020-2021. Mr. Ben-Joseph holds a master’s degree with honors in computer science from Johns Hopkins University, and a bachelor’s degree in computer science from Florida Atlantic University. He is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Computer Science at University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Stephen Malina

2021 Foresight Fellow in Machine Learning for Virus & Protein Design

Stephen is currently an ML scientist at Dyno Therapeutics (dynotx.com), where he’s working on applying machine learning to design better viral vectors for gene therapy. Immediately prior to joining Dyno, Stephen graduated from Columbia with an MS, during which he worked on ML and causal inference for genomics. Before that, he worked as an infrastructure/backend software engineer at Uber and at a startup called Compass before that.

Molecular Machines

James Arthur Cooper

2021 Foresight Fellow in Transmembrane Molecular Nanotechnology

James Arthur Cooper is a Lecturer in Organic Chemistry at the University of Reading in the UK. His current research interests focus on the development of stimuli-responsive transmembrane assemblies and coupling molecular networks with compartmentalized architectures. James is also the chair of the Foresight Molecular Machines Group.

Prior to joining Reading, James received his undergraduate education from the University of York, a PhD from the University of Bristol, and conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Edinburgh and Northwestern University. His previous research focused on the development of synthetic transmembrane anion transporters, using transmembrane protein nanopores to study interactions at the single-molecule level, systems chemistry, and the development of artificial molecular machines.

Maxim Ziatdinov

2021 Foresight Fellow in Physics-Guided AI for Molecular Machines

Dr. Ziatdinov’s research is directed primarily toward the synergy of theory, experiment, and machine learning for accelerated discoveries in the fields of materials science and nanoscience. He is particularly interested in developing physics-based machine learning approaches for automatic reading/recognition of complex molecular, atomic and electronic patterns from scanning probe and electron microscopy experiments on various nanoscale systems and in machine learning-enabled “smart” automation of imaging and spectroscopic instrumentation.

Yunyan Qiu

2021 Foresight Fellow in Molecular Machines

Yunyan Qiu is currently a postdoctoral fellow with Sir Fraser Stoddart at Northwestern University (NU), where he researches in the field of molecular machines and related functional materials. Most of his work at NU is to design and harness artificial molecular machines (AMMs) to produce functional polymers and materials in a controlled manner. As a polymer chemist by training, he developed an ever-increasing amount of interest in exploring practical applications of artificial molecular pumps (AMPs), a subset of AMMs, in polymer chemistry and materials science. In particular, he worked on harnessing AMPs as precise polyrotaxane synthesizers to produce enthalpically and entropically demanding mechanically interlocked polymers with exquisite control over the number of threaded rings.

Yunyan is originally from China. He completed his undergraduate training at Peking University, majoring in Pharmaceutical Sciences. Then he came to the US and earned his PhD degree in Chemistry at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) under the guidance of Professor Kevin Noonan and Tomek Kowalewski. At CMU, his research encompassed organometallic chemistry and polymer science, focusing on the rational design of conjugated polymers and the development of controlled methodologies to afford well-defined functional materials using metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. In 2018, he was selected to be one of the 2018 PMSE Future Faculty Scholars and honored to participate in the 2018 CAS SciFinder Future Leaders program. In 2020, Yunyan was awarded one of the 2020 IIN Outstanding Researchers Awards by the International Institute for Nanotechnology (IIN) and the 2020 Dream Chemistry Top 5 Prize organized by the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Czech Academy of Sciences.

Jessica V. Lamb

2021 Foresight Fellow in Molecular Catalysis

After graduating with First Class Honors in Chemistry (M.Chem.) from the University of Leeds, Jessica completed her doctorate (D.Phil.) in Inorganic Chemistry at the University of Oxford. Her current research focuses on designing novel metallocene catalysts for targeted polymerization applications, which has led to the development and planned commercialization of a new industrial-scale catalyst system. Her patented research has yielded 8 papers in the last two years and resulted in her presenting her work around the world. She was also recently recruited by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to move her research to the U.S. and apply her work to the upcycling of plastic waste.

Thomas Schroeder

2021 Foresight Fellow in Biologically Inspired Engineering

After receiving an undergraduate degree in chemistry from Northwestern, Tom pursued a Ph.D. in chemical engineering under Michael Mayer at the University of Michigan, which he received in 2017 after moving with the group to the Adolphe Merkle Institute in Fribourg, Switzerland in early 2016. There, he and his coworkers designed an electrical power source made of gels and salt that was based on the anatomy of the electric eel and was capable of generating over 100 volts. Since late 2018, Tom has been working as a postdoctoral fellow in Joanna Aizenberg’s lab at Harvard. Tom is interested in the ways in which biological macromolecules mediate ion transport in living systems to produce emergent functions that enable complex life. For example, the opening and closing of ion channels in insulating membranes underlies the function of the nervous system, and the precise deposition of salts from solution onto protein templates enables the formation of skeletal structures such as bone with controlled morphologies. Tom seeks to learn from these processes and apply the lessons to the design of synthetic materials. His current research focuses on using responsive chemistry and polymer physics to control the generation of electrical signals and the growth of crystals in polymeric systems.

Liang Feng

2021 Foresight Fellow in Molecular Machines and Robust Dynamics

Liang Feng is currently a postdoctoral fellow at Prof. Fraser Stoddart’s group at Northwestern University. He earned his B.Sc. in Chemistry from Wuhan University in 2016 under the guidance of Prof. Hexiang Deng, and obtained his Ph.D. in 2020 from Texas A&M University under the supervision of Prof. Hong-Cai Zhou. During this graduate period, he focused on the synthesis of framework nanomaterials with hierarchical nanoporosities, architectures, and compositions and their applications in catalysis, transportation, and gas separation. More specifically, he developed several general synthetic strategies, including linker thermolysis, reinstallation and migration, modular synthesis and programming, in a quest to engineer hierarchical porosity, distribution and composition in multicomponent metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and their hierarchical superstructures. He is currently most enthusiastic about achieving the repeated dynamics of molecular machines in systems that exhibit “robust dynamics”.

Dr. Feng was the recipient of the 2020 Distinguished Student Award from the Foresight Institute. Over the past three years, Liang has published twenty-eight peer-reviewed articles as a first/co-first author and sixteen peer-reviewed articles as a contributing author in prestigious journals. His graduate research accomplishments have also been recognized by, in 2020, the Materials Research Society Graduate Student Award, the Elsevier Reaxys PhD Prize Finalist, Texas A&M Distinguished Graduate Student Award for Excellence in Research, Dow Chemical Company Charlene Black Miller ’79 Endowed Memorial Fellowship in Chemistry, and the Chinese Government Award for Outstanding Self-Financed Students Abroad. Currently, his work has received a total citation of 2,062 with an h-index of 19 (accessed on Dec. 7, 2020).

Intelligent Cooperation

Jazear Brooks

2021 Foresight Fellow in Decentralized Market Design

Jazear is a computer scientist (BS Computer Science and Economics from Yale) with a decade of leadership and engineering experience working within the technology and financial services industry. Before moving into blockchain, Jazear held positions at Microsoft, Glassboard, Pixorial, and Madrone (a hedge fund analytics company). Blockchain became Jazear’s paradise when he was able to combine his skill set in engineering and economics to develop novel cryptoeconomic models and trading strategies. Jazear has developed blockchain software for various notable cryptocurrency projects including Cosmos and Thorchain before starting Sifchain.

Sifchain’s mission is to be an omni-chain DEX. It will also simplify the process of blockchain integration, lowering the development process for the open source community so that additional cross-chain integrations will be cost minimized in terms of money and developer resources.

Sifchain’s goal is for new blockchains to consider cross-chain integration as essential as a wallet or block explorer. Liquidity from all cryptocurrencies can then be accessed on-chain, allowing the coordinated deployment of capital from all cryptocurrencies by DAOs.

Christine Webber

2021 Foresight Fellow in Decentralized Social Networks

Christopher Lemmer Webber works on decentralized/federated social network systems and on other technical issues surrounding expanding user freedom and agency. Chris co-authored and co-edited the W3C ActivityPub standard, which as of 2020 is the most popular and widely deployed web-based decentralized social network protocol to date. Their current work on Spritely is a research project on advancing decentralized social networks by introducing better privacy and security through integrating object capability theory, as well as exploring how to expand these systems towards full virtual worlds with richness of interactions parallel to our own.

Kate Sills

2021 Foresight Fellow in Smart Contracts

Kate Sills is a software engineer at Agoric, building composable smart contract components in a secure subset of JavaScript. Previously, Kate has researched and written on the potential uses of smart contracts to enforce agreements and create institutions orthogonal to legal jurisdictions. Kate earned her degree in CS from UC Berkeley, and is building a tiny house in her spare time.

Joscha Bach

2021 Foresight Fellow in Cognitive Systems and Artificial Intelligence

Worked as AI researcher at Humboldt University of Berlin, Waikato University, University of Osnabrück, MIT Media Lab and Harvard Program for Evolutionary Dynamics, currently VP of Research at AI Foundation, San Francisco. My main interest lies in using AI as a lens to understand the human mind, and minds in general, with a focus on agency, autonomy and motivation, and their relationship to perception and control.

Zhu Xiaohu

2021 Foresight Fellow in Safe AGI

Xiaohu (Neil) Zhu is the Founder and Chief Scientist of University AI, an organization providing AI education and training for individuals and big companies in China. He got a master degree on AI in Nanjing University with a background on algorithmic game theory, mathematical logic, deep learning, and reinforcement learning. He started the investigation on AGI/AI safety in 2016 and now focuses on mechanism design / value alignment / robust and safe (Multi-Agent) RL. He has translated several books on AGI/AI safety and Alignment Newsletters by Rohin Shah, Richard Ngo, Dan Hendrycks, and Cody Wild, as well as the sequence of posts from DeepMind and OpenAI. Now He is building a team researching on Safe AGI in China.

Existential Hope

David Manheim

2021 Foresight Fellow in Positive Long Term Futures

David Manheim a post-doctoral researcher focusing on long-term risks and future prospects for humanity. His recent work for has focused on understanding and mitigating global catastrophic risks, and most recently responding to and learning from COVID-19. Prior to this, he completed a PhD in public policy and decision theory at the RAND Corporation while doing work that ranged from informing policy decisionmaking for infectious diseases, to flood insurance and resiliency building in the wake of catastrophes, to counter-terrorism finance and virtual currencies.

Primavera De Filippi

2021 Foresight Fellow in Extitutional Theory

Primavera De Filippi is a Permanent Researcher at the National Center of Scientific Research (CNRS) in Paris, a Faculty Associate at the Berkman-Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, and a Visiting Fellow at the European University Institute.

Former member of the Global Future Council on Blockchain Technologies at the World Economic Forum, she is the founder and coordinator of the Internet Governance Forum’s dynamic coalitions on Blockchain Technology (COALA).

Her research focuses on the legal challenges and opportunities of blockchain technology and artificial intelligence, with specific focus on trust and governance. She is the author of the book “Blockchain and the Law,” published by Harvard University Press. She has recently been awarded a €2M grant from the European Research Council to investigate the implications of blockchain technology on institutional governance and global governance.

Primavera is also an artist (http://plantoid.org) and legal expert for Creative Commons in France.

Yip Fai Tsei

2021 Foresight Fellow in Animal Ethics For Artificial Intelligence

Fai is a strategy and research consultant at Mercy For Animals. With a focus on Asia, he specializes in determining the best approaches to protecting farmed animals. Fai is also a 2021 Tianxia fellow. Outside his role at MFA, Fai researches the development of artificial intelligence and its implications for animal suffering. He aims to build or assist in building a new field of animal ethics that is applicable to sophisticated technologies, especially artificial intelligence. He hopes, in turn, to help create a positive long-term future for all sentient beings.

With a background in chemistry, economics, and philosophy, Fai is also interested in US-China relations and how they relate to the future he envisions. In his former role at a state-owned material-science company in Beijing, Fai gained invaluable experience in communicating and collaborating with the Chinese government and party officials. He was instrumental in securing the company’s first government technological development grant. Fai is also a multiple patent holder in the fields of material science and industrial production.

For artificial intelligence to be truly beneficial and ethical, Fai believes we cannot overlook its impact on nonhuman animals. He also believes that artificial intelligence will present humanity with great opportunities to make the world a better place for everyone, including nonhuman animals.

He has recently become a research assistant of Peter Singer, researching Animal Ethics For Artificial Intelligence. The project is supported by Princeton University’s University Center for Human Values (UCHV) and the Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP) where Yip is working as a contractor.

Phoebe Tickell

2021 Foresight Fellow in Ecosystem Capacity Building

Phoebe is a complex systems thinker developing new systems and governance better suited for a complex world. Previously Researcher at Imperial College London in Microbial Engineering, now Associate Lecturer at Schumacher College, she has worked across multiple contexts applying a complexity and systems thinking lens to governance, organisational design, philanthropy, advising government, education and strategy. She sits on the Advisory Board of the International Bateson Institute.

She is an ex-microbiologist and 10+ years systems thinker. She works across multiple societal contexts applying a complexity and systems thinking lens and has worked in organisational design, advised government, the education sector and the food and farming sector. Most recently, this is in the field of philanthropy and funding. She is working in The National Lottery Community Fund to implement systems-thinking approaches to funding and reporting models and leading insight and learning at the Digital Fund.

Phoebe has been called “the voice of the emerging future” and “one of the most important systems thinkers of her generation”. She is a systems thinker developing new routes and approaches to perceiving complexity, and designing better systems and governance for a complex, interdependent world.

Fellowship class of 2020

The Foresight Fellowship is an exclusive one year supportive program committed to giving change-makers the support and mentorship to accelerate their bold ideas into the future.

Our mission is to catalyze collaboration among leading young scientists, engineers, and innovators who are working on emerging new technologies that have the power to transform society. Since 1993 Foresight Institute has been rewarding those who are making strides in the field of Nanotechnology with the Feynman Prize. In 2016, one of our former Feynman Prize winners, Sir J. Fraser Stoddart, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work with molecular machines. Foresight Institute recognizes that providing a strong network and knowledge base for new fellows to access will accelerate their missions and reflect our goals to further support those making important strides in a variety of fields.

During the 1 year program, Fellows will be invited to engage in events, connect to fellows and mentors, and increase their skills to succeed with their endeavors. See our 2020 Fellows in action.

 

Felix Andreas Faber

2020 Foresight Fellow in Machine Learning accelerated Drug- and Materials discovery

I received a B.Sc. and a M.Sc. in physics at Linköping University in Sweden, followed by a Ph.D. in chemistry at the University of Basel.  My master’s thesis, which was later published in the International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, was one of the first works that demonstrated successful learning of crystal formation energies.

In my Ph.D. I developed machine learning techniques for modeling fundamental quantum mechanical properties.  Such properties include energies, forces, and dipole moments of crystals and molecules. In one of my first Ph.D. projects, which was published in Physical Review Letters, we used a machine learning model to predict formation energies of almost 2 million Elpasolite crystal structures. We also used this model to identify around 90 potentially thermodynamically stable structures.I was also among those who pioneered the use of quantum mechanical operators directly on machine learning models, which results in improved performance and is a stepping stone towards universal machine learning modeling of quantum mechanical properties.

Additionally, I dedicated parts of my Ph.D. to benchmarking and comparing the performance of different machine learning models. In one such example we, in collaboration with scientists from google, performed one of the most comprehensive comparisons of different machine learning models to date.

I envision a research framework where these techniques could be harnessed to understand and model biological and materials systems of varying complexity. Such fundamental models could be used to develop therapeutics, as well as new materials tailored for exhibiting specific properties. To those ends, I recently started a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Cambridge, where applying the models that I developed during my Ph.D. to discover new drugs and materials.

Matthew R Ryder

2020 Foresight Fellow in Molecular-Scale Engineering

Originally from the Shetland Islands in the North of Scotland, Matthew graduated with First Class Honors in Chemistry with Computational Chemistry (M.Chem.) from Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh. He then completed his graduate studies (D.Phil.) at the University of Oxford before being awarded an EPSRC Doctoral Prize Fellowship to continue his research at the University of Oxford. He was recruited soon after by the U.S. Department of Energy to work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as the “youngest person ever to be offered the prestigious Clifford G. Shull Fellowship.” He has published 28 research papers and been awarded numerous prizes, including being named “one of the most promising scientists in the U.K..”

Matthew’s research focuses on understanding materials at the molecular level using quantum mechanics in conjunction with synchrotron and neutron experiments. His work aims to reveal the structural possibilities of next-generation porous materials and explain the fundamental mechanisms responsible for anomalous behavior. He sits on the editorial boards of two journals, and was the co-editor of a special issue on ‘Computers in Neutron Science.’ He is the lead principal investigator (PI) on multiple projects involving highly porous materials and Co-PI of a multidisciplinary project recently awarded $1.45M to tackle waste plastics by upcycling to performance-advantaged polymers.

Daniel Bojar

2020 Foresight Fellow in Health & Longevity

Daniel’s background in structural biology, strengthened by a B.Sc. in biochemistry (University of Tuebingen, Germany, 2014) and a M.Sc. in biophysics (ETH Zurich, Switzerland, 2016) with distinction, enabled him to understand biological processes down to the atomic level. During his doctoral work with Dr. Martin Fussenegger at ETH Zurich, Daniel employed these fundamental insights to genetically re-engineer human cells for therapeutic purposes. Creatively using the principles of synthetic biology, he designed new proteins with a dedicated function – such as a novel caffeine receptor – and used these intricate tools to develop potent new cell-based therapies for diabetes mellitus and Parkinson’s disease. Further, Daniel was distinguished by several prestigious fellowships, such as the Excellence Scholarship and Opportunity Program of ETH Zurich and by the German Academic Scholarship Foundation, as well as in the form of a Selected Young Scientist at the 68th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, an honor extended to the 600 most promising biomedical scientists worldwide. As a postdoctoral fellow with Dr. James J. Collins at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, Daniel harnesses the potency of cutting edge machine learning techniques to elucidate the biological functions of glycans since September 2019. Often described as the “third language of life” after DNA and proteins, glycans are by far the most complex and plastic biopolymer in humans. While these macromolecules are crucial to every human disease, glycobiology is still a predominantly experimental, and severely neglected, area of research. Daniel was the first researcher to devise, develop, and apply methods derived from artificial intelligence to glycans and begin to tame their astounding complexity. His research could therefore pave the way for exciting new insights and novel therapies for grueling human diseases.

In 2020, Daniel, was selected to be part of the prestigious Branco Weiss Fellowship – Society in Science 2020 Fellows, and as such was awarded $106,000 annually for five years to work on connecting machine learning and glycobiology, towards unveiling the inner workings of biology and facilitating biomedical therapies of tomorrow.

Giuliana Rotola

2020 Foresight Fellow in Space Studies

Giuliana holds a joint bachelor and master’s degree from the University of Trento in Comparative, European and Transnational Law. During her studies, she was a research intern in the European Centre for Space Law (ECSL – ESA), and she conducted independent researches in the Institut du Droit de l’Espace et des Télécommunications (IDEST) for her final dissertation on militarization, weaponization and the prevention of an arms race in outer space. In September 2018, Giuliana attended the 27th Summer Course in Space Law and Policy organized by ECSL. In February 2019, she joined the Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies as a research intern. There, she worked, among the others, on publications on Space Archaeology, and space contribution to the UN SDGs. During the ECSL Young Lawyers’ Symposium 2019, she presented her work on the protection of cultural heritage sites on the Moon. She later contributed to the creation of the first digital registry of items on the Moon, with For All Moonkind. Moreover, her research on the relation between SDG 6 – Clean water and sanitation and space technologies was presented as a Conference Room Paper at the 62nd session of COPUOS within the framework of the “Space for Youth Competition“.

From September 2019, Giuliana is taking a Master of Space Studies at the International Space University. There, she is carrying out a team project on the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, and an individual research project on the collection of genetic data and human genetic engineering in the space realm.

Caroline Jeanmaire

2020 Foresight Fellow in Artificial Intelligence Governance

Caroline researches international coordination models to ensure the safety and reliability of Artificial Intelligence systems at UC Berkeley Center for Human-Compatible AI (CHAI). She also leads CHAI’s partnership and external relations strategy, focusing on building a research community around AI safety and relationships with key stakeholders. Before working at CHAI, she was an AI Policy Researcher and Project Manager at The Future Society, a think-tank incubated at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. She notably supported the organization of the first and second Global Governance of AI Forums at the World Government Summit in Dubai. In the 2019 edition, she managed two committees: Geopolitics of AI and International Panel on AI research. She published articles and reports on the Geopolitics of AI, US-China industry levers of cooperation on AI and the results of a global civic debate on AI governance. Before this, she participated in numerous climate negotiations and technical intersessions since 2015, including with the French Delegation for COP23 and COP24. Caroline speaks English, French, Spanish and Mandarin Chinese. She has a Master’s degree in International Relations from Peking University and a Master’s degree in International Public Management from Sciences Po Paris. She received her Bachelor’s degree in political sciences from Sciences Po Paris. She also studied at the Graduate Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and at Tufts

Daniel Elton

2020 Foresight Fellow in Artificial Intelligence

Daniel Elton is a Staff Scientist at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center working on applications of artificial intelligence to medical imaging. Much of his recent work is on improving automated measurements in CT and MRI scans using deep learning. He also works on theoretical issues surrounding robustness, explainability, and transparency.  While his work mainly touches on issues relevant to near-term AI safety, he maintains an interest in long term AI safety research and existential risk reduction more generally.  

Originally from a small town in upstate New York, he received a bachelor’s degree physics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 2010 and earned a Ph.D. in physics from Stony Brook University in 2016. During postdoctoral work at the University of Maryland he worked on deep learning for molecular property prediction, generative AI models for molecular design, and applications of natural language processing to the chemical domain

links: 

http://www.moreisdifferent.com/

https://twitter.com/moreisdifferent

Alevtina Evgrafova

2020 Foresight Fellow in Sustainable Agriculture

Dr. Alevtina Evgrafova is a PostDoc at the Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research in Germany. Her research focuses on future integrated scenarios of soil management for sustainability impact assessment. Alevtina is particularly working on the development of participatory transdisciplinary science-driven scenarios of soil management at the German national level within the BonaRes initiative. Her interests encompass a range of different topics such as sustainable land management, policy-making, urban and rural development, environmental impact assessment as well as technologies & innovations. During her involvement in both academic and industrial projects, Alevtina has been actively encouraging the support for early-career researchers and international cooperation.   

Alevtina is originally from Russia, where she obtained her double Diploma (with honors) in Soil Science (MSc) and Pedagogy (MA) from Lomonosov Moscow State University. Afterwards, she obtained a joint MSc in Environmental Protection and Agricultural Food Production from Wageningen University, Netherlands and University of Hohenheim, Germany in 2013. Recently, Alevtina has completed her PhD in Geography (magna cum laude) with the focus on permafrost-affected soils from University of Bern, Switzerland.

Tony Lai

2020 Foresight Fellow in Legal Engineering for the Biosphere

Tony Lai is a Fellow and Chair of the Blockchain Working Group at CodeX, the Stanford Center for Legal Informatics; a Senior Research Fellow at the National University of Singapore’s Center for Technology, Robotics, AI, and the Law; and a founding Editor of the Stanford Journal on Blockchain Law and Policy, and of the MIT Computational Law Report. Tony runs world-building experiments focused on legal engineering, convening interdisciplinary academic, governmental, and professional collaborations to test and deploy models of interoperable governance.

Jeffrey Ladish

2020 Foresight Fellow in Biosecurity

Jeffrey is a security and research consultant focused on addressing systemic risks from emerging technologies. His research areas include nuclear proliferation and deterrence, engineered organisms, and frameworks for international cooperation. With a background in evolutionary theory and information security, Jeffrey believes personal bios are not to be trusted.

Tessa Alexanian

2020 Foresight Fellow in Responsible Biotechnology

Tessa Alexanian spends her weekdays wrangling robots to accelerate biological engineering and her evenings trying to make sure biologists engineer the right things.

She has been organizing biosecurity events in the San Francisco bay area since 2018, first as a founder of East Bay Biosecurity Group and recently as the instigator of the Catalyst collaborative biosecurity summit.

She is a member of two of the organizing committees for iGEM, an international synthetic biology competition that brings together thousands of students from dozens of countries each year. The Safety and Security committee reviews risk assessments submitted by iGEM teams, while the Human Practices committee nudges students to consider the broad impacts of their projects through ethical analyses, stakeholder interviews, and other public engagement.

Tessa has recently begun volunteering with a team working on privacy-preserving contact tracing for COVID-19.

Fellowship class of 2019

The Foresight Fellowship is an exclusive one year supportive program committed to giving change-makers the support and mentorship to accelerate their bold ideas into the future. 

Our mission is to catalyze collaboration among leading young scientists, engineers, and innovators who are working on emerging new technologies that have the power to transform society. Since 1993 Foresight Institute has been rewarding those who are making strides in the field of Nanotechnology with the Feynman Prize. In 2016, one of our former Feynman Prize winners, Sir J. Fraser Stoddart, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work with molecular machines. Foresight Institute recognizes that providing a strong network and knowledge base for new fellows to access will accelerate their missions and reflect our goals to further support those making important strides in a variety of fields.

During the 1 year program, Fellows will be invited to engage in events, connect to fellows and mentors, and increase their skills to succeed with their endeavors. 

 

Durham Smith

Artificial Intelligence & Artificial General Intelligence

Durham works towards using artificial intelligence and quantum computing to explore chemical space to find molecules able to solve the problems the world faces. Durham’s goal is to harness the power of chemistry to the extent that nature has, without taking the time it took nature. This means creating better tools to discover/design chemical and chemical systems of interest. He believes that the recent advances in AI & quantum computing offer the promise to provide us with the ability to do just that. The incredible impact this would have on society coupled with how incredibly interesting these fields are what drives the work Durham does.

Durham is the CEO of Futurefy, which develops cutting edge machine learning models to greatly improve the speed of calculation of molecular properties and structures. These models are integrated into molecule discovery pipelines to help industries find the molecules needed to solve their specific problems.

Michael M. Lerch

Nanotechnology: molecular machines, atomically-precise construction

Michael M. Lerch – a native of Switzerland – studied Interdisciplinary Sciences at ETH Zurich in his B.Sc. (2012) and M.Sc. (2014) focusing on organic synthesis and cellular biology. Further, he was a visiting student researcher at the University of Cambridge (2012) and the California Institute of Technology (2013/2014). Subsequently, he worked with Prof. Dr. Ben L. Feringa at the University of Groningen (The Netherlands) and completed his Ph.D. with distinction (cum laude). In Groningen, he employed photocontrolled small molecules to control the behavior of biological systems. In photopharmacology, he helped develop novel drug candidates that can be switched ‘ON’ and ‘OFF’ with light. Moreover, he focused on unravelling the photoswitching mechanism of an emerging class of photoswitches, so-called donor-acceptor Stenhouse adducts, that included research visits to the University of Florence/LENS Laserlab Europe.

Since Nov. 2018, Michael works as a postdoctoral fellow with Prof. Joanna Aizenberg at Harvard University and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering (supported by a NWO Rubicon grant). His research focuses on microstructured liquid crystalline surfaces with self-regulated motion and feedback-controlled optically active hydrogels. He is fascinated by nature’s materials and combines his expertise in organic synthesis, supramolecular- and photochemistry with engineering approaches to create hybrid materials with the ability to self-regulate, coordinate their action and communicate.

Patrick Mellor

Environment: Clean Energy and Clean Air

Patrick’s academic background is in paleobiology and the evolution of episodic memory, cognitive empathy, and self-concept in the hominin lineage (most recent publication Episodic Memory, Phenomenal Empathy, and the Representation of Time, January 2018). He has taught philosophy at San Francisco State University, and previously studied Biological Sciences at Oxford. 

 

For the last year, he has been researching the feasibility of various methods of achieving near term CO2 drawdown from the atmosphere, inspired by work he did at Oxford on the effects of climatic shifts on the historical biogeography of the Mediterranean basin, and informed by analysis of the interaction between the biosphere and the climate system through geological time. This is explored in his recent article in Palladium Magazine: Ancient Upheavals: How to Geoengineer a Stable Climate and a presentation he gave at the Foresight Institute Atomic Precision for Healing the Planet technical competition. He is currently forming the organization LivingCarbon, having concluded that bioengineering decomposition resistant wood holds great potential for CO2 drawdown. 

He recently published a book of poetry, Alkali Shores, and is fascinated by the ecology of the California deserts, as examples of biological systems maintaining functional integration, and forming complex and interdependent relationships among their member species in the face of extreme external adversity. He has lived in the Bay Area for the last 14 years and before this in Oxford and London, where he was born.

TJ Brunette

Nanotechnology: molecular machines, atomically-precise construction

TJ’s background in protein design, machine learning and robotics provides a unique perspective to tackle building functional protein assemblies. He completed my Ph.D. in computer science at the University of Massachusetts Amherst with Oliver Brock where he applied machine learning and robotics algorithms toward protein structure prediction. Since then, he has been a postdoctoral fellow with David Baker at the University of Washington studying protein design where he does both computational algorithm development and testing of the designed proteins in the wet-lab.

TJ’s postdoctoral work pioneered modular repeat proteins that can be connected together like building blocks which he demonstrated in recent first-author papers in PNAS(in review) and Nature. In the Nature publication he shows that large de-novo repeat proteins can be designed from scratch with atomic level precision. In PNAS(in review) he shows that these repeat proteins can be connected together like legos into arbitrary nano-scale shapes. As part of these papers he developed several algorithms that dramatically improve the computational efficiency of building and testing de-novo proteins. These algorithms will likely impact science much more broadly than the repeat proteins. These algorithms have already enabled numerous projects within the Baker lab ranging from protein/peptide binders, to gated membrane channels and protein motors. In his academic lab, he will build a research program around using deep learning to design functional protein assemblies for immunological applications, and hybrid protein materials for bioelectronic applications.

Congratulations to our 2018 class of Foresight Fellows!

The Foresight Fellowship is an exclusive one year supportive program committed to giving change-makers the support and mentorship to accelerate their bold ideas into the future. 

Our mission is to catalyze collaboration among leading young scientists, engineers, and innovators who are working on emerging new technologies that have the power to transform society. Since 1993 Foresight Institute has been rewarding those who are making strides in the field of Nanotechnology with the Feynman Prize. In 2016, one of our former Feynman Prize winners, Sir J. Fraser Stoddart, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work with molecular machines. Foresight Institute recognizes that providing a strong network and knowledge base for new fellows to access will accelerate their missions and reflect our goals to further support those making important strides in a variety of fields.

During the 1 year program, Fellows will be invited to engage in events, connect to fellows and mentors, and increase their skills to succeed with their endeavors. 

Ryan Carey

Artificial Intelligence & Safe Machine Learning

Ryan is a research contractor at Ought Inc. His current work focused on aggregating answers from safe question-answering systems. Previously, he has worked on the task of predicting slow human judgments. In his past work at the Machine Intelligence Research Institute, he touched on issues such as how systems ought to behave if they have bugs in their code, and how systems ought to learn and explore if they occasionally encounter catastrophes.

Sergei Kalinin

Fellow in Electron Beam Atom by Atom Assembly

Sergei is the director of the ORNL Institute for Functional Imaging of Materials and distinguished research staff member at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (at ORNL since 2002).  He also holds a Joint Associate Professor position at the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. His research interests include application of big data and machine learning in atomically resolved and mesoscopic imaging to guide the development of advanced materials for energy and information technologies, electromechanics and electrochemistry of nanoscale systems, as well as applications of electron beam for direct atom by atom assembly of matter.

Jane Lippencott

Fellow in Blockchain Governance

Jane is on the founding team of ZenCash, a privacy coin that powers an encrypted platform for messaging and transactions, and is now Head of Academic Partnerships. She is also co-founder of Eden, a blockchain consulting and advisory firm that focuses on tokeneconomics, human systems design, and governance. Jane is advisor to Blockhous, Ezra Fund, Moveco, Cord, Ejad Labs, and TOSCoin, and is Co-Director of MADE Innovation Blockchain Incubator in Bangkok. Her experience ranges from financial analysis in asset and wealth management at Bank of America Merrill Lynch and China Silver Asset Management to programmes, strategy, innovation, and partnerships in the venture capital, startup accelerators, and FinTech space at Nest VC, SOSV, Monexo, and Next Money. 

 

Nusrat Jahan M. Sanghamitra

Fellow in Molecular Machines

Nusrat is an innovator, best described as a scientist, entrepreneur and motivator, committed to make a difference in people’s life by her scientific and personal endeavors. Nusrat started her research journey with a mission ‘to find a better anticancer drug with fewer side effects’. She is a chemist by training with a fascination for biology. Her research has been well cited. After actively pursuing research at the institutes of International repute, she founded CyCa OncoSolutions to translate her ideas and research (at the interface of chemistry, biomaterials, cell biology and its applications in anticancer drug development) from bench to bedside, to make an impact in oncology and to make significant contribution to the global fight against cancer. Her long term vision and dream is to establish a center as an one spot solution for cancer in her native place in Odisha, India and make high quality cancer therapy and care affordable by following a ‘patient-centric’ healthcare model.

 

Andres Ochoa

Fellow in Artificial Intelligence for Life Extension

Andres is a Serial Entrepreneur, Advisor and Public Speaker. He has over 10 years of experience in Biotechnology and Bioinformatics for the public and private sectors in the United States, Brazil, and Germany. Andres reviews scientific journals and holds 11 honors/awards. He develops and supports technologies and business that use biotechnology to create global impact. His current work as Chief Technology Officer at OneSkin Technologies is to connect the data discovery in genomics to the laboratory experimentation, helping to transform data obtained using Machine Learning to valuable aging molecular markers to fight aging.

 

Bharath Ramsundar

Fellow in Artificial Intelligence for Molecular Machines

Bharath received a BA and BS from UC Berkeley in EECS and Mathematics and was valedictorian of his graduating class in mathematics. He did his PhD in computer science at Stanford University where he studied the application of deep-learning to problems in drug-discovery. At Stanford, Bharath created the deepchem.io open-source project to grow the deep drug discovery open source community, co-created the moleculenet.ai benchmark suite to facilitate development of molecular algorithms, and more. Bharath’s graduate education was supported by a Hertz Fellowship. Bharath is the lead author of “TensorFlow for Deep Learning: From Linear Regression to Reinforcement Learning”, a developer’s introduction to modern machine learning, with O’Reilly Media. Today, Bharath is focused on designing the decentralized protocols that will unlock data and AI to create the next stage of the internet.

 

Peter Scheyer

Fellow in Corporate Artificial General Intelligence & Computer Security

Peter is a U.S. Air Force veteran in cybersecurity, holds an MBA, and as a serial entrepreneur has founded over ten companies. His research into corporations as artificial persons and collective intelligences has been credited as a novel and foundational approach to corporate governance by professionals in the legal, policy, and commercial spheres. Peter is the author of AGI, Corporations, and Alignment Literature Review, a literature review seeking to combine research on artificial intelligence with findings on corporations, then to explore implications of these findings for entity alignment studies.

 

Damien Sluysmans

Fellow in Single-Molecule Characterization of Molecular Machines

Damien is currently a postdoctoral fellow (Belgian American Educational Foundation fellow) at Northwestern University (IL, USA) in the group of Prof. Fraser Stoddart, where he is working on the design and single-molecule characterization of artificial molecular muscles. Damien received a Ph.D. in Science from the University of Liège (Belgium) in 2017, working under the supervision of Prof. Anne-Sophie Duwez. During his doctoral thesis, Damien focused on the mechanochemical properties of oligorotaxane foldamers at the single-molecule level, using the atomic force microscopy (AFM). He also obtained a MS and BS in Chemistry (physical chemistry, material chemistry) both from the University of Liège. In 2017, Damien obtained a Vocatio grant from the Ernest Solvay funds (Belgium). This grant is dedicated to the development of his vocation for the study of small machineries, and their use in nanotechnology.

 

Grigory Tikhomirov

Fellow in DNA Nanotechnology

Grigory is a senior postdoctoral scholar in Bioengineering at California Institute of Technology. Trained as a professional dancer and a basketball player, Greg has always been fascinated by the capabilities and hierarchical structure of the human body. Reading Feynman’s visionary lectures on nanotechnology during his undergraduate studies at Moscow University, Greg became captivated by the growing promise of nanoscience. Now, Greg combines his interest in biology and nanotechnology to build structures approaching the complexity of living organisms, starting from small completely synthetic building blocks. He is interested both in understanding the fundamental principles required to build such structures as well as developing materials for applications in medicine and technology using these principles. Greg was awarded the 2019 Robert Dirks Molecular Programming Prize of the California Institute of Technology for his work engineering hierarchical, disordered, and reconfigurable programmable nanostructures, demonstrating principles for scaling up structural complexity, trading off deterministic control for structural diversity, and implementing autonomous structural reconfiguration. 

 

Roman V. Yampolskiy

Fellow in Artificial Intelligence Safety & Security

Roman is a Tenured Associate Professor in the department of Computer Engineering and Computer Science at the Speed School of Engineering, University of Louisville. He is the founding and current director of the Cyber Security Lab and an author of many books including Artificial Superintelligence: a Futuristic Approach. Roman holds a PhD degree from the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University at Buffalo. He was a recipient of a four year NSF (National Science Foundation) IGERT (Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship) fellowship.

 

Congratulations to our 2017 inaugural class of Foresight Fellows!

Find out more here.

The Foresight Fellowship is an exclusive one year supportive program committed to giving change-makers the support and mentorship to accelerate their bold ideas into the future. 

Our mission is to catalyze collaboration among leading young scientists, engineers, and innovators who are working on emerging new technologies that have the power to transform society. Since 1993 Foresight Institute has been rewarding those who are making strides in the field of Nanotechnology with the Feynman Prize. In 2016, one of our former Feynman Prize winners, Sir J. Fraser Stoddart, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work with molecular machines. Foresight Institute recognizes that providing a strong network and knowledge base for new fellows to access will accelerate their missions and reflect our goals to further support those making important strides in a variety of fields.

During the 1 year program, Fellows will be invited to engage in events, connect to fellows and mentors, and increase their skills to succeed with their endeavors. 

Jonathan Barnes

Synthetic Polymer Chemistry

Jonathan Barnes is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Washington University in St. Louis. Jonathan received his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from Northwestern University, an MS in Organic Chemistry and B.S. in Chemistry both from the University of Kentucky. Inspired by the art of synthetic organic chemistry, Jonathan looks outside of the physical sciences as inspiration for making functional organic materials and molecular machines that may be used to solve problems in chemistry, energy, and human health.

 

Chuyang Cheng

Molecular Machines

Chuyang Cheng is currently a Postdoc Researcher working in Sir Fraser Stoddart’s group at Northwestern University, from which he received his Ph.D. in Chemistry. He received his BS in Chemistry from Peking University. His research focus is on design and synthesis molecular machines as well as incorporating molecular machines into functional materials. Mr. Cheng was the recipient of the 2015 Distinguished Student Award from the Foresight Institute. He is most enthusiastic about controlling molecules to do what he expects them to do precisely.

 

 

Kimberly Hamad-Schifferli

Biomolecular Machines

Kimberly Hamad-Schifferli is currently Associate Professor of Engineering, College of Science at University of Massachusetts Boston and Visiting Scientist, Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT.  Her areas of expertise are nanotechnology, nanobiotechnology, nanomaterials, and rapid diagnostics. Kimberly received her Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley, and an S.B. in Chemistry from MIT. Her mission is to create a scientific legacy, which means training people that are not only skilled and creative, but also have a strong sense of citizenship and integrity.

 

 

 

Eric Hinterman

Space Technologies

Eric Hinterman is a current Ph.D. Candidate at MIT in Astronautics and a NASA Space Technology Research Fellow. He received his B.S. in Chemical Engineering (Magna Cum Laude) from the University of Notre Dame and worked in the chemicals industry for three years prior to beginning his graduate studies. Eric is intensely driven to develop technologies needed to colonize Mars, as he believes it is critically necessary to increase the long-term survivability of humanity by colonizing another planet. His background in chemical engineering and current program in astronautics provide a unique basis for his studies in the development of in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) technologies critical to enabling astronauts to survive on Mars. He hopes to move into industry after receiving his degree and drive humanity towards space colonization for the betterment of future generations.

 

Cosmo Mielke

Longevity

Cosmo Mielke is currently the founder of Infino.me, a nonprofit research project to study aging with user donated quantified self data. Cosmo received his PhD in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology from the Biodesign Institute and the Mayo Clinic, and a B.S. in Astronomy, Physics and Mathematics from the University of Arizona. He is also a data scientist in the UCSF Memory and Aging Center, where he manages the computational pipelines to analyze MRI scans of Alzheimer’s patients. He is inspired most by the rapidly changing landscape of science.

 

 

Michael Skuhersky

Mind Uploading

Michael Skuhersky is a graduate student in the Synthetic Neurobiology group at the MIT Media Lab. Previously, he was at the MIT Center for Bits and Atoms, working on protein docking dynamics, rapid fabrication techniques, and spatial computing architectures. Before that, he conducted research in various areas of particle physics at MIT and UCLA. He is passionate about devoting his time to making mind uploading a reality in his lifetime; currently he is attempting to build and validate an emulation of a simple brain that will respond to and deliver external stimuli in the exact same way as that of a real organism. He has also dabbled in practical applications of transhumanism while running a novel prosthetics startup aimed at the Chinese market. In his spare time, he goes hiking, studies world politics, and composes experimental music.

 

Eva-Maria Strauch

Protein Design

Eva-Maria Strauch is currently an acting instructor/translational investigator at the University of Washington’s Institute for Protein Design. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin’s Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry.  She is inspired by the meticulous atomic details by which proteins are arranged and their involvement in almost all processes in life. She believes that if we understand how a virus’s proteins encode information about how to enter and hijack specific cells, we will identify its Achilles heel and be able to stop viral infections. We might also learn new ways to fight cancer cells.