Advance could speed RNA nanotechnology

By |2017-06-01T14:15:58-07:00January 20th, 2011|Articles, Artificial Molecular Machines, Atomically Precise Manufacturing (APM), Bionanotechnology, Found On Web, Molecular manufacturing, Molecular Nanotechnology, Nano, Nanobiotechnology, Nanodot, Nanotech, Nanotechnology, Productive Nanosystems, Research, Reviews|

RNA nanostructures chemically modified to be resistant to degradation retain 3D structure and biological activity.

Update and summary of potential applications of medical nanorobotics

By |2017-06-01T14:04:29-07:00January 10th, 2011|Articles, Artificial Molecular Machines, Atomically Precise Manufacturing (APM), Bionanotechnology, Future Medicine, Life extension, Molecular manufacturing, Molecular Nanotechnology, Nano, Nanobiotechnology, Nanodot, Nanomedicine, Nanotech, Nanotechnology, Productive Nanosystems, Reports & publications, Reviews, Robotics|

Robert A. Freitas Jr. has made available his chapter on nanorobotics from the book The Future of Aging.

Theoretical analysis of powering nanorobots with blood glucose and oxygen

By |2017-06-01T14:04:33-07:00November 4th, 2010|Articles, Artificial Molecular Machines, Atomically Precise Manufacturing (APM), Energy, Future Medicine, Molecular manufacturing, Molecular Nanotechnology, Nano, Nanodot, Nanomedicine, Nanotech, Nanotechnology, Research, Robotics|

Hogg and Freitas provide a theoretical analysis of the power constraints when nanorobots rely entirely on ambient bloodstream oxygen and glucose and identify aspects of nanorobot design that significantly affect available power.

Prediction

By |2017-06-01T14:05:19-07:00December 4th, 2009|Articles, Nanodot|

Futurists make lots of predictions, and usually by the time they can be tested they've been long forgotten. That's great when we get them wrong (which is a lot more [...]

Soon to be released 'Exploring Nanotechnology' CD

By |2017-06-01T10:31:57-07:00May 2nd, 2005|Articles, Media Mentions|

Nanopolis writes "Imagine what would happen if you could introduce your break-through technology to thousands of viewers comprised of venture capitalists, banks, investors, brokerage firms, industrial and research players?

Find out by participating in the collaborative Nanopolis encyclopedias. The exclusive multimedia "Exploring Nanotechnology" encyclopedia CD-ROM will be launched within 30 days !

More...

Multicolor Wavelength-Agile Lasers At Your Service

By |2017-06-01T14:21:13-07:00May 2nd, 2005|Articles, Nanodot, Nanoscale Bulk Technologies|

Roland Piquepaille writes "Laser lights can be used for optical sensing applications, for example to identify unknown gases emitted by an engine. And as these unknown substances react differently to different wavelengths, researchers at the University of Wisconsin at Madison have developed unique wavelength-agile lasers. And I'm amazed by the beauty and the simplicity of their idea. They're using white lasers which produce all colors simultaneously -- but with a twist. The white laser light goes through a 20-kilometers long optical fiber before reaching its target. And because different colors 'travel' at different speeds, this produces independent results for the different wavelengths. The researchers are using spectral resolutions smaller than a thousandth of a nanometer and they are able to get all the results within a millionth of a second. This method could be used to design cleaner engines or data storage applications in a few years. Read more for other details, pictures and references."

NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Trade Show

By |2017-06-01T10:31:59-07:00April 30th, 2005|About Foresight, Articles|

Just a reminder that the NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Trade Show is coming up May 8-12, 2005 at the Anaheim Marriott & Convention Center in Anaheim, California. From the looks of the confirmed speaker list many people who have been mentioned on Nanodot or who have spoken at previous Foresight Insitute Conferences will be there.

Also worth noting is that the super early registration period for the Foresight Institute's 13th annual conference which will be in San Francisco October 22-27th, 2005 ends June 1st. The first two days are essentially what was previously known as the "Senior Associates" conference. The last four days are about busines, policy and R&D progress. This is explained in greater detail in the conference brochure here.

'Smart' Nanocarriers to Fight Cancer

By |2017-06-01T14:15:46-07:00April 29th, 2005|Articles, Future Medicine, Nanodot|

Roland Piquepaille writes "Today, anticancer drugs are delivered to patients in such a way that they can destroy both infected and healthy cells. But now, researchers at the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN), in Singapore, have designed 'smart' nanocarriers which deliver the drugs exactly where they are needed, reducing side effects and suppressing cancer growth. Their core-shell nanoparticles are both sensitive to temperature -- which has been done before -- and to acidic levels. When these nanocarriers encounter acidic environments such as tumor tissues, they break apart and release the molecules they contain. So far, this technology has only been tested on mice, but the researchers have filed an application patent in the U.S., so expect to see practical applications in a few years. Read more for other details and references. [Additional note for purists: these nanocarriers are "smaller than 200 nm," which doesn't guarantee they fit within the strict definition of nanotechnology. However, if the Advanced Materials journal thinks these are nanoparticles, who am I to argue?]"

Low temperature combustion using nanotechnology

By |2017-06-01T14:16:58-07:00April 21st, 2005|Articles, Nanodot, Nanoscale Bulk Technologies|

Science Daily is documenting that Zhiyu Hu and associates, researchers at ORNL has developed a method for binding platinum nanoparticles to glass wool fibers that will enable a nano-catalytic reaction (aren't *all* catalytic reactions "nano-" by definition?) to allow self-combustion of methanol at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 600 deg. C.

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